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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

And while he talked and watched her as he talked, she answered, and 

behind her listening watched and thought about him. She liked the 

animated eagerness of his manner. 

 

His mind seemed to be a remarkably full one; his knowledge of detailed 

reality came in just where her own mind was most weakly equipped. 

Through all he said ran one quality that pleased her--the quality of a 

man who feels that things can be done, that one need not wait for the 

world to push one before one moved. Compared with her father and Mr. 

Manning and the men in "fixed" positions generally that she knew, 

Ramage, presented by himself, had a fine suggestion of freedom, of 

power, of deliberate and sustained adventure.... 

 

She was particularly charmed by his theory of friendship. It was really 

very jolly to talk to a man in this way--who saw the woman in her and 

did not treat her as a child. She was inclined to think that perhaps 

for a girl the converse of his method was the case; an older man, a 

man beyond the range of anything "nonsensical," was, perhaps, the most 

interesting sort of friend one could meet. But in that reservation it 

may be she went a little beyond the converse of his view.... 

 

They got on wonderfully well together. They talked for the better part 

of an hour, and at last walked together to the junction of highroad 

and the bridle-path. There, after protestations of friendliness and 

helpfulness that were almost ardent, he mounted a little clumsily and 

rode off at an amiable pace, looking his best, making a leg with 

his riding gaiters, smiling and saluting, while Ann Veronica turned 

northward and so came to Micklechesil. There, in a little tea and 

sweet-stuff shop, she bought and consumed slowly and absent-mindedly the 

insufficient nourishment that is natural to her sex on such occasions. 

 


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