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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

falling in love. His invalid wife and her money had been only the thin 

thread that held his life together; beaded on that permanent relation 

had been an inter-weaving series of other feminine experiences, 

disturbing, absorbing, interesting, memorable affairs. Each one had 

been different from the others, each had had a quality all its own, a 

distinctive freshness, a distinctive beauty. He could not understand how 

men could live ignoring this one predominant interest, this wonderful 

research into personality and the possibilities of pleasing, these 

complex, fascinating expeditions that began in interest and mounted to 

the supremest, most passionate intimacy. All the rest of his existence 

was subordinate to this pursuit; he lived for it, worked for it, kept 

himself in training for it. 

 

So while he talked to this girl of work and freedom, his slightly 

protuberant eyes were noting the gracious balance of her limbs and body 

across the gate, the fine lines of her chin and neck. Her grave fine 

face, her warm clear complexion, had already aroused his curiosity as he 

had gone to and fro in Morningside Park, and here suddenly he was 

near to her and talking freely and intimately. He had found her in 

a communicative mood, and he used the accumulated skill of years in 

turning that to account. 

 

She was pleased and a little flattered by his interest and sympathy. She 

became eager to explain herself, to show herself in the right light. He 

was manifestly exerting his mind for her, and she found herself fully 

disposed to justify his interest. 

 

She, perhaps, displayed herself rather consciously as a fine 

person unduly limited. She even touched lightly on her father's 

unreasonableness. 

 

"I wonder," said Ramage, "that more girls don't think as you do and want 

to strike out in the world." 

 

And then he speculated. "I wonder if you will?" 

 

"Let me say one thing," he said. "If ever you do and I can help you 

in any way, by advice or inquiry or recommendation--You see, I'm no 

believer in feminine incapacity, but I do perceive there is such a thing 

as feminine inexperience. As a sex you're a little under-trained--in 

affairs. I'd take it--forgive me if I seem a little urgent--as a sort of 

proof of friendliness. I can imagine nothing more pleasant in life than 

to help you, because I know it would pay to help you. There's something 

about you, a little flavor of Will, I suppose, that makes one feel--good 

luck about you and success...." 


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