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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

of the things I've just been thinking over. Suppose--suppose a girl 

did want to start in life, start in life for herself--" She looked him 

frankly in the eyes. "What ought she to do?" 

 

"Suppose you--" 

 

"Yes, suppose I--" 

 

He felt that his advice was being asked. He became a little more 

personal and intimate. "I wonder what you could do?" he said. "I should 

think YOU could do all sorts of things.... 

 

"What ought you to do?" He began to produce his knowledge of the world 

for her benefit, jerkily and allusively, and with a strong, rank flavor 

of "savoir faire." He took an optimist view of her chances. Ann Veronica 

listened thoughtfully, with her eyes on the turf, and now and then she 

asked a question or looked up to discuss a point. In the meanwhile, 

as he talked, he scrutinized her face, ran his eyes over her careless, 

gracious poise, wondered hard about her. He described her privately to 

himself as a splendid girl. It was clear she wanted to get away from 

home, that she was impatient to get away from home. Why? While the front 

of his mind was busy warning her not to fall into the hopeless miseries 

of underpaid teaching, and explaining his idea that for women of 

initiative, quite as much as for men, the world of business had by far 

the best chances, the back chambers of his brain were busy with the 

problem of that "Why?" 

 

His first idea as a man of the world was to explain her unrest by a 

lover, some secret or forbidden or impossible lover. But he dismissed 

that because then she would ask her lover and not him all these things. 

Restlessness, then, was the trouble, simple restlessness: home bored 

her. He could quite understand the daughter of Mr. Stanley being bored 

and feeling limited. But was that enough? Dim, formless suspicions 

of something more vital wandered about his mind. Was the young lady 

impatient for experience? Was she adventurous? As a man of the world he 

did not think it becoming to accept maidenly calm as anything more than 

a mask. Warm life was behind that always, even if it slept. If it 

was not an actual personal lover, it still might be the lover not yet 

incarnate, not yet perhaps suspected.... 

 

He had diverged only a little from the truth when he said that his 

chief interest in life was women. It wasn't so much women as Woman that 

engaged his mind. His was the Latin turn of thinking; he had fallen 

in love at thirteen, and he was still capable--he prided himself--of 


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