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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

soit qui mal y pense. The change has given man one good thing he never 

had before," he said. "Girl friends. And I am coming to believe the best 

as well as the most beautiful friends a man can have are girl friends." 

 

He paused, and went on, after a keen look at her: 

 

"I had rather gossip to a really intelligent girl than to any man 

alive." 

 

"I suppose we ARE more free than we were?" said Ann Veronica, keeping 

the question general. 

 

"Oh, there's no doubt of it! Since the girls of the eighties broke 

bounds and sailed away on bicycles--my young days go back to the very 

beginnings of that--it's been one triumphant relaxation." 

 

"Relaxation, perhaps. But are we any more free?" 

 

"Well?" 

 

"I mean we've long strings to tether us, but we are bound all the same. 

A woman isn't much freer--in reality." 

 

Mr. Ramage demurred. 

 

"One runs about," said Ann Veronica. 

 

"Yes." 

 

"But it's on condition one doesn't do anything." 

 

"Do what?" 

 

"Oh!--anything." 

 

He looked interrogation with a faint smile. 

 

"It seems to me it comes to earning one's living in the long run," said 

Ann Veronica, coloring faintly. "Until a girl can go away as a son does 

and earn her independent income, she's still on a string. It may be a 

long string, long enough if you like to tangle up all sorts of people; 

but there it is! If the paymaster pulls, home she must go. That's what I 

mean." 

 

Mr. Ramage admitted the force of that. He was a little impressed by 

Ann Veronica's metaphor of the string, which, indeed, she owed to Hetty 

Widgett. "YOU wouldn't like to be independent?" he asked, abruptly. "I 

mean REALLY independent. On your own. It isn't such fun as it seems." 

 

"Every one wants to be independent," said Ann Veronica. "Every one. Man 

or woman." 

 

"And you?" 

 

"Rather!" 

 

"I wonder why?" 

 

"There's no why. It's just to feel--one owns one's self." 

 

"Nobody does that," said Ramage, and kept silence for a moment. 

 

"But a boy--a boy goes out into the world and presently stands on his 

own feet. He buys his own clothes, chooses his own company, makes his 

own way of living." 

 

"You'd like to do that?" 

 

"Exactly." 

 

"Would you like to be a boy?" 

 

"I wonder! It's out of the question, any way." 

 

Ramage reflected. "Why don't you?" 

 

"Well, it might mean rather a row." 

 

"I know--" said Ramage, with sympathy. 

 

"And besides," said Ann Veronica, sweeping that aspect aside, "what 

could I do? A boy sails out into a trade or profession. But--it's one 


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