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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

secretly deplored the ugliness of equine teeth. Ramage tethered the 

horse to the farther gate-post, and Caesar blew heavily and began to 

investigate the hedge. 

 

Ramage leaned over the gate at Ann Veronica's side, and for a moment 

there was silence. 

 

He made some obvious comments on the wide view warming toward its 

autumnal blaze that spread itself in hill and valley, wood and village, 

below. 

 

"It's as broad as life," said Mr. Ramage, regarding it and putting a 

well-booted foot up on the bottom rail. 

 

 

 

Part 7 

 

 

"And what are you doing here, young lady," he said, looking up at her 

face, "wandering alone so far from home?" 

 

"I like long walks," said Ann Veronica, looking down on him. 

 

"Solitary walks?" 

 

"That's the point of them. I think over all sorts of things." 

 

"Problems?" 

 

"Sometimes quite difficult problems." 

 

"You're lucky to live in an age when you can do so. Your mother, 

for instance, couldn't. She had to do her thinking at home--under 

inspection." 

 

She looked down on him thoughtfully, and he let his admiration of her 

free young poise show in his face. 

 

"I suppose things have changed?" she said. 

 

"Never was such an age of transition." 

 

She wondered what to. Mr. Ramage did not know. "Sufficient unto me is 

the change thereof," he said, with all the effect of an epigram. 

 

"I must confess," he said, "the New Woman and the New Girl intrigue me 

profoundly. I am one of those people who are interested in women, more 

interested than I am in anything else. I don't conceal it. And the 

change, the change of attitude! The way all the old clingingness 

has been thrown aside is amazing. And all the old--the old trick of 

shrinking up like a snail at a touch. If you had lived twenty years ago 

you would have been called a Young Person, and it would have been your 

chief duty in life not to know, never to have heard of, and never to 

understand." 

 

"There's quite enough still," said Ann Veronica, smiling, "that one 

doesn't understand." 

 

"Quite. But your role would have been to go about saying, 'I beg your 

pardon' in a reproving tone to things you understood quite well in your 

heart and saw no harm in. That terrible Young Person! she's vanished. 

Lost, stolen, or strayed, the Young Person!... I hope we may never 

find her again." 

 

He rejoiced over this emancipation. "While that lamb was about every man 

of any spirit was regarded as a dangerous wolf. We wore invisible chains 

and invisible blinkers. Now, you and I can gossip at a gate, and Honi 


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