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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

happened, a new set of guides and controls, a new set of obligations and 

responsibilities and limitations, had replaced the old. "I want to be 

a Person," said Ann Veronica to the downs and the open sky; "I will not 

have this happen to me, whatever else may happen in its place." 

 

Ann Veronica had three things very definitely settled by the time when, 

a little after mid-day, she found herself perched up on a gate between a 

bridle-path and a field that commanded the whole wide stretch of country 

between Chalking and Waldersham. Firstly, she did not intend to marry at 

all, and particularly she did not mean to marry Mr. Manning; secondly, 

by some measure or other, she meant to go on with her studies, not at 

the Tredgold Schools but at the Imperial College; and, thirdly, she was, 

as an immediate and decisive act, a symbol of just exactly where she 

stood, a declaration of free and adult initiative, going that night to 

the Fadden Ball. 

 

But the possible attitude of her father she had still to face. So far 

she had the utmost difficulty in getting on to that vitally important 

matter. The whole of that relationship persisted in remaining obscure. 

What would happen when next morning she returned to Morningside Park? 

 

He couldn't turn her out of doors. But what he could do or might do she 

could not imagine. She was not afraid of violence, but she was afraid of 

something mean, some secondary kind of force. Suppose he stopped all her 

allowance, made it imperative that she should either stay ineffectually 

resentful at home or earn a living for herself at once.... It 

appeared highly probable to her that he would stop her allowance. 

 

What can a girl do? 

 

Somewhere at this point Ann Veronica's speculations were interrupted 

and turned aside by the approach of a horse and rider. Mr. Ramage, that 

iron-gray man of the world, appeared dressed in a bowler hat and a suit 

of hard gray, astride of a black horse. He pulled rein at the sight of 

her, saluted, and regarded her with his rather too protuberant eyes. The 

girl's gaze met his in interested inquiry. 

 

"You've got my view," he said, after a pensive second. "I always get off 

here and lean over that rail for a bit. May I do so to-day?" 

 

"It's your gate," she said, amiably; "you got it first. It's for you to 

say if I may sit on it." 

 

He slipped off the horse. "Let me introduce you to Caesar," he said; 

and she patted Caesar's neck, and remarked how soft his nose was, and 


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