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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

the objection?" 

 

"I suppose she ought to know?" said Gwen to her mother, trying to alter 

the key of the conversation. 

 

"You see, Vee," said Mrs. Stanley, "Mr. Fortescue is an actor, and your 

father does not approve of the profession." 

 

"Oh!" said Ann Veronica. "I thought they made knights of actors?" 

 

"They may of Hal some day," said Gwen. "But it's a long business." 

 

"I suppose this makes you an actress?" said Ann Veronica. 

 

"I don't know whether I shall go on," said Gwen, a novel note of 

languorous professionalism creeping into her voice. "The other women 

don't much like it if husband and wife work together, and I don't think 

Hal would like me to act away from him." 

 

Ann Veronica regarded her sister with a new respect, but the traditions 

of family life are strong. "I don't suppose you'll be able to do it 

much," said Ann Veronica. 

 

Later Gwen's trouble weighed so heavily on Mrs. Stanley in her illness 

that her husband consented to receive Mr. Fortescue in the drawing-room, 

and actually shake hands with him in an entirely hopeless manner and 

hope everything would turn out for the best. 

 

The forgiveness and reconciliation was a cold and formal affair, and 

afterwards her father went off gloomily to his study, and Mr. Fortescue 

rambled round the garden with soft, propitiatory steps, the Corinthian 

nose upraised and his hands behind his back, pausing to look long and 

hard at the fruit-trees against the wall. 

 

Ann Veronica watched him from the dining-room window, and after some 

moments of maidenly hesitation rambled out into the garden in a reverse 

direction to Mr. Fortescue's steps, and encountered him with an air of 

artless surprise. 

 

"Hello!" said Ann Veronica, with arms akimbo and a careless, breathless 

manner. "You Mr. Fortescue?" 

 

"At your service. You Ann Veronica?" 

 

"Rather! I say--did you marry Gwen?" 

 

"Yes." 

 

"Why?" 

 

Mr. Fortescue raised his eyebrows and assumed a light-comedy expression. 

"I suppose I fell in love with her, Ann Veronica." 

 

"Rum," said Ann Veronica. "Have you got to keep her now?" 

 

"To the best of my ability," said Mr. Fortescue, with a bow. 

 

"Have you much ability?" asked Ann Veronica. 

 

Mr. Fortescue tried to act embarrassment in order to conceal its 

reality, and Ann Veronica went on to ask a string of questions about 

acting, and whether her sister would act, and was she beautiful enough 

for it, and who would make her dresses, and so on. 


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