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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

incomprehensible way that back view made her feel sorry for Alice. Also 

she remembered very vividly the smell of orange blossom, and Alice, 

drooping and spiritless, mumbling responses, facing Doctor Ralph, while 

the Rev. Edward Bribble stood between them with an open book. Doctor 

Ralph looked kind and large, and listened to Alice's responses as though 

he was listening to symptoms and thought that on the whole she was 

progressing favorably. 

 

And afterward her mother and Alice kissed long and clung to each other. 

And Doctor Ralph stood by looking considerate. He and her father shook 

hands manfully. 

 

Ann Veronica had got quite interested in Mr. Bribble's rendering of the 

service--he had the sort of voice that brings out things--and was still 

teeming with ideas about it when finally a wild outburst from the organ 

made it clear that, whatever snivelling there might be down in the 

chancel, that excellent wind instrument was, in its Mendelssohnian 

way, as glad as ever it could be. "Pump, pump, per-um-pump, Pum, Pump, 

Per-um...." 

 

The wedding-breakfast was for Ann Veronica a spectacle of the unreal 

consuming the real; she liked that part very well, until she was 

carelessly served against her expressed wishes with mayonnaise. She 

was caught by an uncle, whose opinion she valued, making faces at Roddy 

because he had exulted at this. 

 

Of the vast mass of these impressions Ann Veronica could make nothing 

at the time; there they were--Fact! She stored them away in a mind 

naturally retentive, as a squirrel stores away nuts, for further 

digestion. Only one thing emerged with any reasonable clarity in her 

mind at once, and that was that unless she was saved from drowning by 

an unmarried man, in which case the ceremony is unavoidable, or totally 

destitute of under-clothing, and so driven to get a trousseau, in which 

hardship a trousseau would certainly be "ripping," marriage was an 

experience to be strenuously evaded. 

 

When they were going home she asked her mother why she and Gwen and 

Alice had cried. 

 

"Ssh!" said her mother, and then added, "A little natural feeling, 

dear." 

 

"But didn't Alice want to marry Doctor Ralph?" 

 

"Oh, ssh, Vee!" said her mother, with an evasion as patent as an 

advertisement board. "I am sure she will be very happy indeed with 

Doctor Ralph." 

 

But Ann Veronica was by no means sure of that until she went over 

to Wamblesmith and saw her sister, very remote and domestic and 

authoritative, in a becoming tea-gown, in command of Doctor Ralph's 


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