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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

Alice and the elopement of her second sister, Gwen. 

 

These convulsions occurred when Ann Veronica was about twelve. There 

was a gulf of eight years between her and the youngest of her brace of 

sisters--an impassable gulf inhabited chaotically by two noisy brothers. 

These sisters moved in a grown-up world inaccessible to Ann Veronica's 

sympathies, and to a large extent remote from her curiosity. She got 

into rows through meddling with their shoes and tennis-rackets, and had 

moments of carefully concealed admiration when she was privileged to see 

them just before her bedtime, rather radiantly dressed in white or pink 

or amber and prepared to go out with her mother. She thought Alice a bit 

of a sneak, an opinion her brothers shared, and Gwen rather a snatch 

at meals. She saw nothing of their love-making, and came home from her 

boarding-school in a state of decently suppressed curiosity for Alice's 

wedding. 

 

Her impressions of this cardinal ceremony were rich and confused, 

complicated by a quite transitory passion that awakened no reciprocal 

fire for a fat curly headed cousin in black velveteen and a lace 

collar, who assisted as a page. She followed him about persistently, and 

succeeded, after a brisk, unchivalrous struggle (in which he pinched and 

asked her to "cheese it"), in kissing him among the raspberries behind 

the greenhouse. Afterward her brother Roddy, also strange in velveteen, 

feeling rather than knowing of this relationship, punched this Adonis's 

head. 

 

A marriage in the house proved to be exciting but extremely 

disorganizing. Everything seemed designed to unhinge the mind and 

make the cat wretched. All the furniture was moved, all the meals were 

disarranged, and everybody, Ann Veronica included, appeared in new, 

bright costumes. She had to wear cream and a brown sash and a short 

frock and her hair down, and Gwen cream and a brown sash and a long 

skirt and her hair up. And her mother, looking unusually alert and 

hectic, wore cream and brown also, made up in a more complicated manner. 

 

Ann Veronica was much impressed by a mighty trying on and altering and 

fussing about Alice's "things"--Alice was being re-costumed from garret 

to cellar, with a walking-dress and walking-boots to measure, and a 

bride's costume of the most ravishing description, and stockings and 

such like beyond the dreams of avarice--and a constant and increasing 

dripping into the house of irrelevant remarkable objects, such as-- 


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