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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

 

Part 3 

 

 

Her mind got back to the Fadden Ball. 

 

She meant to go, she meant to go, she meant to go. Nothing would stop 

her, and she was prepared to face the consequences. Suppose her father 

turned her out of doors! She did not care, she meant to go. She would 

just walk out of the house and go.... 

 

She thought of her costume in some detail and with considerable 

satisfaction, and particularly of a very jolly property dagger with 

large glass jewels in the handle, that reposed in a drawer in her room. 

She was to be a Corsair's Bride. "Fancy stabbing a man for jealousy!" 

she thought. "You'd have to think how to get in between his bones." 

 

She thought of her father, and with an effort dismissed him from her 

mind. 

 

She tried to imagine the collective effect of the Fadden Ball; she had 

never seen a fancy-dress gathering in her life. Mr. Manning came into 

her thoughts again, an unexpected, tall, dark, self-contained presence 

at the Fadden. One might suppose him turning up; he knew a lot of clever 

people, and some of them might belong to the class. What would he come 

as? 

 

Presently she roused herself with a guilty start from the task of 

dressing and re-dressing Mr. Manning in fancy costume, as though he 

was a doll. She had tried him as a Crusader, in which guise he seemed 

plausible but heavy--"There IS something heavy about him; I wonder if 

it's his mustache?"--and as a Hussar, which made him preposterous, and 

as a Black Brunswicker, which was better, and as an Arab sheik. Also 

she had tried him as a dragoman and as a gendarme, which seemed the most 

suitable of all to his severely handsome, immobile profile. She felt 

he would tell people the way, control traffic, and refuse admission 

to public buildings with invincible correctness and the very finest 

explicit feelings possible. For each costume she had devised a suitable 

form of matrimonial refusal. "Oh, Lord!" she said, discovering what she 

was up to, and dropped lightly from the fence upon the turf and went on 

her way toward the crest. 

 

"I shall never marry," said Ann Veronica, resolutely; "I'm not the sort. 

That's why it's so important I should take my own line now." 

 

 

Part 4 

 

 

Ann Veronica's ideas of marriage were limited and unsystematic. Her 

teachers and mistresses had done their best to stamp her mind with an 

ineradicable persuasion that it was tremendously important, and on no 

account to be thought about. Her first intimations of marriage as a fact 

of extreme significance in a woman's life had come with the marriage of 


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