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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

ordered mind, had to decide upon the general relations of men to women, 

the objects and conditions of marriage and its bearing upon the 

welfare of the race, the purpose of the race, the purpose, if any, of 

everything.... 

 

"Frightful lot of things aren't settled," said Ann Veronica. In 

addition, the Fadden Dance business, all out of proportion, occupied 

the whole foreground of her thoughts and threw a color of rebellion 

over everything. She kept thinking she was thinking about Mr. Manning's 

proposal of marriage and finding she was thinking of the dance. 

 

For a time her efforts to achieve a comprehensive concentration were 

dispersed by the passage of the village street of Caddington, the 

passing of a goggled car-load of motorists, and the struggles of a 

stable lad mounted on one recalcitrant horse and leading another. When 

she got back to her questions again in the monotonous high-road that led 

up the hill, she found the image of Mr. Manning central in her mind. 

He stood there, large and dark, enunciating, in his clear voice from 

beneath his large mustache, clear flat sentences, deliberately kindly. 

He proposed, he wanted to possess her! He loved her. 

 

Ann Veronica felt no repulsion at the prospect. That Mr. Manning loved 

her presented itself to her bloodlessly, stilled from any imaginative 

quiver or thrill of passion or disgust. The relationship seemed to have 

almost as much to do with blood and body as a mortgage. It was something 

that would create a mutual claim, a relationship. It was in another 

world from that in which men will die for a kiss, and touching hands 

lights fires that burn up lives--the world of romance, the world of 

passionately beautiful things. 

 

But that other world, in spite of her resolute exclusion of it, was 

always looking round corners and peeping through chinks and crannies, 

and rustling and raiding into the order in which she chose to live, 

shining out of pictures at her, echoing in lyrics and music; it invaded 

her dreams, it wrote up broken and enigmatical sentences upon the 

passage walls of her mind. She was aware of it now as if it were a 

voice shouting outside a house, shouting passionate verities in a hot 

sunlight, a voice that cries while people talk insincerely in a darkened 

room and pretend not to hear. Its shouting now did in some occult manner 

convey a protest that Mr. Manning would on no account do, though he 

was tall and dark and handsome and kind, and thirty-five and adequately 


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