Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

have got it; but I have never yet wanted anything in my life as I have 

wanted you. It isn't the same thing. I am afraid because I love you, so 

that the mere thought of failure hurts. If I did not love you so much I 

believe I could win you by sheer force of character, for people tell me 

I am naturally of the dominating type. Most of my successes in life have 

been made with a sort of reckless vigor. 

 

"Well, I have said what I had to say, stumblingly and badly, and baldly. 

But I am sick of tearing up letters and hopeless of getting what I have 

to say better said. It would be easy enough for me to write an eloquent 

letter about something else. Only I do not care to write about anything 

else. Let me put the main question to you now that I could not put the 

other afternoon. Will you marry me, Ann Veronica? 

 

"Very sincerely yours, 

 

"HUBERT MANNING." 

 

 

Ann Veronica read this letter through with grave, attentive eyes. 

 

Her interest grew as she read, a certain distaste disappeared. Twice she 

smiled, but not unkindly. Then she went back and mixed up the sheets in 

a search for particular passages. Finally she fell into reflection. 

 

"Odd!" she said. "I suppose I shall have to write an answer. It's so 

different from what one has been led to expect." 

 

She became aware of her aunt, through the panes of the greenhouse, 

advancing with an air of serene unconsciousness from among the raspberry 

canes. 

 

"No you don't!" said Ann Veronica, and walked out at a brisk and 

business-like pace toward the house. 

 

"I'm going for a long tramp, auntie," she said. 

 

"Alone, dear?" 

 

"Yes, aunt. I've got a lot of things to think about." 

 

Miss Stanley reflected as Ann Veronica went toward the house. She 

thought her niece very hard and very self-possessed and self-confident. 

She ought to be softened and tender and confidential at this phase of 

her life. She seemed to have no idea whatever of the emotional states 

that were becoming to her age and position. Miss Stanley walked round 

the garden thinking, and presently house and garden reverberated to Ann 

Veronica's slamming of the front door. 

 

"I wonder!" said Miss Stanley. 

 

For a long time she surveyed a row of towering holly-hocks, as though 

they offered an explanation. Then she went in and up-stairs, hesitated 

on the landing, and finally, a little breathless and with an air of 

great dignity, opened the door and walked into Ann Veronica's room. It 


Page 4 from 7:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   6   7   Forward