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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

further expectations through my aunt, so that I can offer you a life 

of wide and generous refinement, travel, books, discussion, and easy 

relations with a circle of clever and brilliant and thoughtful people 

with whom my literary work has brought me into contact, and of which, 

seeing me only as you have done alone in Morningside Park, you can have 

no idea. I have a certain standing not only as a singer but as a critic, 

and I belong to one of the most brilliant causerie dinner clubs of 

the day, in which successful Bohemianism, politicians, men of affairs, 

artists, sculptors, and cultivated noblemen generally, mingle together 

in the easiest and most delightful intercourse. That is my real milieu, 

and one that I am convinced you would not only adorn but delight in. 

 

"I find it very hard to write this letter. There are so many things 

I want to tell you, and they stand on such different levels, that 

the effect is necessarily confusing and discordant, and I find myself 

doubting if I am really giving you the thread of emotion that should run 

through all this letter. For although I must confess it reads very much 

like an application or a testimonial or some such thing as that, I can 

assure you I am writing this in fear and trembling with a sinking heart. 

My mind is full of ideas and images that I have been cherishing and 

accumulating--dreams of travelling side by side, of lunching quietly 

together in some jolly restaurant, of moonlight and music and all that 

side of life, of seeing you dressed like a queen and shining in some 

brilliant throng--mine; of your looking at flowers in some old-world 

garden, our garden--there are splendid places to be got down in Surrey, 

and a little runabout motor is quite within my means. You know they say, 

as, indeed, I have just quoted already, that all bad poetry is written 

in a state of emotion, but I have no doubt that this is true of bad 

offers of marriage. I have often felt before that it is only when one 

has nothing to say that one can write easy poetry. Witness Browning. And 

how can I get into one brief letter the complex accumulated desires of 

what is now, I find on reference to my diary, nearly sixteen months of 

letting my mind run on you--ever since that jolly party at Surbiton, 

where we raced and beat the other boat. You steered and I rowed stroke. 

My very sentences stumble and give way. But I do not even care if I am 

absurd. I am a resolute man, and hitherto when I have wanted a thing I 


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