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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

CHAPTER THE THIRD 

 

THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS 

 

Part 1 

 

Two days after came the day of the Crisis, the day of the Fadden Dance. 

It would have been a crisis anyhow, but it was complicated in Ann 

Veronica's mind by the fact that a letter lay on the breakfast-table 

from Mr. Manning, and that her aunt focussed a brightly tactful 

disregard upon this throughout the meal. Ann Veronica had come down 

thinking of nothing in the world but her inflexible resolution to go to 

the dance in the teeth of all opposition. She did not know Mr. Manning's 

handwriting, and opened his letter and read some lines before its import 

appeared. Then for a time she forgot the Fadden affair altogether. 

With a well-simulated unconcern and a heightened color she finished her 

breakfast. 

 

She was not obliged to go to the Tredgold College, because as yet the 

College had not settled down for the session. She was supposed to be 

reading at home, and after breakfast she strolled into the vegetable 

garden, and having taken up a position upon the staging of a disused 

greenhouse that had the double advantage of being hidden from the 

windows of the house and secure from the sudden appearance of any one, 

she resumed the reading of Mr. Manning's letter. 

 

Mr. Manning's handwriting had an air of being clear without being easily 

legible; it was large and rather roundish, with a lack of definition 

about the letters and a disposition to treat the large ones as 

liberal-minded people nowadays treat opinions, as all amounting to the 

same thing really--a years-smoothed boyish rather than an adult hand. 

And it filled seven sheets of notepaper, each written only on one side. 

 

 

"MY DEAR MISS STANLEY," it began,--"I hope you will forgive my 

bothering you with a letter, but I have been thinking very much over our 

conversation at Lady Palsworthy's, and I feel there are things I want 

to say to you so much that I cannot wait until we meet again. It is the 

worst of talk under such social circumstances that it is always getting 

cut off so soon as it is beginning; and I went home that afternoon 

feeling I had said nothing--literally nothing--of the things I had meant 

to say to you and that were coursing through my head. They were things I 

had meant very much to talk to you about, so that I went home vexed and 

disappointed, and only relieved myself a little by writing a few verses. 

I wonder if you will mind very much when I tell you they were suggested 

by you. You must forgive the poet's license I take. Here is one verse. 


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