Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

from her pillow. She charged boldly into the space of Miss Miniver's 

rhetorical pause. 

 

"It isn't quite that we're toys. Nobody toys with me. Nobody regards 

Constance or Vee as a delicate trifle." 

 

Teddy made some confused noise, a thoracic street row; some remark was 

assassinated by a rival in his throat and buried hastily under a cough. 

 

"They'd better not," said Hetty. "The point is we're not toys, toys 

isn't the word; we're litter. We're handfuls. We're regarded as 

inflammable litter that mustn't be left about. We are the species, and 

maternity is our game; that's all right, but nobody wants that admitted 

for fear we should all catch fire, and set about fulfilling the purpose 

of our beings without waiting for further explanations. As if we didn't 

know! The practical trouble is our ages. They used to marry us off at 

seventeen, rush us into things before we had time to protest. They don't 

now. Heaven knows why! They don't marry most of us off now until high up 

in the twenties. And the age gets higher. We have to hang about in the 

interval. There's a great gulf opened, and nobody's got any plans what 

to do with us. So the world is choked with waste and waiting daughters. 

Hanging about! And they start thinking and asking questions, and begin 

to be neither one thing nor the other. We're partly human beings and 

partly females in suspense." 

 

Miss Miniver followed with an expression of perplexity, her mouth shaped 

to futile expositions. The Widgett method of thought puzzled her weakly 

rhetorical mind. "There is no remedy, girls," she began, breathlessly, 

"except the Vote. Give us that--" 

 

Ann Veronica came in with a certain disregard of Miss Miniver. "That's 

it," she said. "They have no plans for us. They have no ideas what to do 

with us." 

 

"Except," said Constance, surveying her work with her head on one side, 

"to keep the matches from the litter." 

 

"And they won't let us make plans for ourselves." 

 

"We will," said Miss Miniver, refusing to be suppressed, "if some of us 

have to be killed to get it." And she pressed her lips together in white 

resolution and nodded, and she was manifestly full of that same passion 

for conflict and self-sacrifice that has given the world martyrs since 

the beginning of things. "I wish I could make every woman, every girl, 

see this as clearly as I see it--just what the Vote means to us. Just 

what it means...." 

 

 

 

 

 

Part 2 

 

 

As Ann Veronica went back along the Avenue to her aunt she became aware 


Page 5 from 6:  Back   1   2   3   4  [5]  6   Forward