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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

"I'm all for the vote," said Teddy. 

 

"I suppose a girl MUST be underpaid and sweated," said Ann Veronica. "I 

suppose there's no way of getting a decent income--independently." 

 

"Women have practically NO economic freedom," said Miss Miniver, 

"because they have no political freedom. Men have seen to that. The one 

profession, the one decent profession, I mean, for a woman--except the 

stage--is teaching, and there we trample on one another. Everywhere 

else--the law, medicine, the Stock Exchange--prejudice bars us." 

 

"There's art," said Ann Veronica, "and writing." 

 

"Every one hasn't the Gift. Even there a woman never gets a fair chance. 

Men are against her. Whatever she does is minimized. All the best 

novels have been written by women, and yet see how men sneer at the lady 

novelist still! There's only one way to get on for a woman, and that is 

to please men. That is what they think we are for!" 

 

"We're beasts," said Teddy. "Beasts!" 

 

But Miss Miniver took no notice of his admission. 

 

"Of course," said Miss Miniver--she went on in a regularly undulating 

voice--"we DO please men. We have that gift. We can see round them and 

behind them and through them, and most of us use that knowledge, in the 

silent way we have, for our great ends. Not all of us, but some of us. 

Too many. I wonder what men would say if we threw the mask aside--if 

we really told them what WE thought of them, really showed them what WE 

were." A flush of excitement crept into her cheeks. 

 

"Maternity," she said, "has been our undoing." 

 

From that she opened out into a long, confused emphatic discourse on the 

position of women, full of wonderful statements, while Constance worked 

at her stencilling and Ann Veronica and Hetty listened, and Teddy 

contributed sympathetic noises and consumed cheap cigarettes. As she 

talked she made weak little gestures with her hands, and she thrust her 

face forward from her bent shoulders; and she peered sometimes at Ann 

Veronica and sometimes at a photograph of the Axenstrasse, near 

Fluelen, that hung upon the wall. Ann Veronica watched her face, vaguely 

sympathizing with her, vaguely disliking her physical insufficiency and 

her convulsive movements, and the fine eyebrows were knit with a faint 

perplexity. Essentially the talk was a mixture of fragments of sentences 

heard, of passages read, or arguments indicated rather than stated, and 

all of it was served in a sauce of strange enthusiasm, thin yet 


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