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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

"Auntie?" asked Constance, who was conversant with Ann Veronica's 

affairs. 

 

"No! My father. It's--it's a serious prohibition." 

 

"Why?" asked Hetty. 

 

"That's the point. I asked him why, and he hadn't a reason." 

 

"YOU ASKED YOUR FATHER FOR A REASON!" said Miss Miniver, with great 

intensity. 

 

"Yes. I tried to have it out with him, but he wouldn't have it out." Ann 

Veronica reflected for an instant "That's why I think I ought to come." 

 

"You asked your father for a reason!" Miss Miniver repeated. 

 

"We always have things out with OUR father, poor dear!" said Hetty. 

"He's got almost to like it." 

 

"Men," said Miss Miniver, "NEVER have a reason. Never! And they don't 

know it! They have no idea of it. It's one of their worst traits, one of 

their very worst." 

 

"But I say, Vee," said Constance, "if you come and you are forbidden to 

come there'll be the deuce of a row." 

 

Ann Veronica was deciding for further confidences. Her situation 

was perplexing her very much, and the Widgett atmosphere was lax and 

sympathetic, and provocative of discussion. "It isn't only the dance," 

she said. 

 

"There's the classes," said Constance, the well-informed. 

 

"There's the whole situation. Apparently I'm not to exist yet. I'm not 

to study, I'm not to grow. I've got to stay at home and remain in a 

state of suspended animation." 

 

"DUSTING!" said Miss Miniver, in a sepulchral voice. 

 

"Until you marry, Vee," said Hetty. 

 

"Well, I don't feel like standing it." 

 

"Thousands of women have married merely for freedom," said Miss Miniver. 

"Thousands! Ugh! And found it a worse slavery." 

 

"I suppose," said Constance, stencilling away at bright pink petals, 

"it's our lot. But it's very beastly." 

 

"What's our lot?" asked her sister. 

 

"Slavery! Downtroddenness! When I think of it I feel all over boot 

marks--men's boots. We hide it bravely, but so it is. Damn! I've 

splashed." 

 

Miss Miniver's manner became impressive. She addressed Ann Veronica 

with an air of conveying great open secrets to her. "As things are at 

present," she said, "it is true. We live under man-made institutions, 

and that is what they amount to. Every girl in the world practically, 

except a few of us who teach or type-write, and then we're underpaid and 

sweated--it's dreadful to think how we are sweated!" She had lost her 

generalization, whatever it was. She hung for a moment, and then went 

on, conclusively, "Until we have the vote that is how things WILL be." 


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