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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

CHAPTER THE SECOND 

 

ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW 

 

Part 1 

 

 

"Are you coming to the Fadden Dance, Ann Veronica?" asked Constance 

Widgett. 

 

Ann Veronica considered her answer. "I mean to," she replied. 

 

"You are making your dress?" 

 

"Such as it is." 

 

They were in the elder Widgett girl's bedroom; Hetty was laid up, she 

said, with a sprained ankle, and a miscellaneous party was gossiping 

away her tedium. It was a large, littered, self-forgetful apartment, 

decorated with unframed charcoal sketches by various incipient masters; 

and an open bookcase, surmounted by plaster casts and the half of a 

human skull, displayed an odd miscellany of books--Shaw and Swinburne, 

Tom Jones, Fabian Essays, Pope and Dumas, cheek by jowl. Constance 

Widgett's abundant copper-red hair was bent down over some dimly 

remunerative work--stencilling in colors upon rough, white material--at 

a kitchen table she had dragged up-stairs for the purpose, while on her 

bed there was seated a slender lady of thirty or so in a dingy green 

dress, whom Constance had introduced with a wave of her hand as Miss 

Miniver. Miss Miniver looked out on the world through large emotional 

blue eyes that were further magnified by the glasses she wore, and her 

nose was pinched and pink, and her mouth was whimsically petulant. Her 

glasses moved quickly as her glance travelled from face to face. 

She seemed bursting with the desire to talk, and watching for her 

opportunity. On her lapel was an ivory button, bearing the words "Votes 

for Women." Ann Veronica sat at the foot of the sufferer's bed, while 

Teddy Widgett, being something of an athlete, occupied the only 

bed-room chair--a decadent piece, essentially a tripod and largely a 

formality--and smoked cigarettes, and tried to conceal the fact that 

he was looking all the time at Ann Veronica's eyebrows. Teddy was the 

hatless young man who had turned Ann Veronica aside from the Avenue two 

days before. He was the junior of both his sisters, co-educated and 

much broken in to feminine society. A bowl of roses, just brought by 

Ann Veronica, adorned the communal dressing-table, and Ann Veronica was 

particularly trim in preparation for a call she was to make with her 

aunt later in the afternoon. 

 

Ann Veronica decided to be more explicit. "I've been," she said, 

"forbidden to come." 

 

"Hul-LO!" said Hetty, turning her head on the pillow; and Teddy remarked 

with profound emotion, "My God!" 

 

"Yes," said Ann Veronica, "and that complicates the situation." 


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