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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

"But, daddy, what do you know of the place and the gathering?" 

 

"And it's entirely out of order; it isn't right, it isn't correct; 

it's impossible for you to stay in an hotel in London--the idea is 

preposterous. I can't imagine what possessed you, Veronica." 

 

He put his head on one side, pulled down the corners of his mouth, and 

looked at her over his glasses. 

 

"But why is it preposterous?" asked Ann Veronica, and fiddled with a 

pipe on the mantel. 

 

"Surely!" he remarked, with an expression of worried appeal. 

 

"You see, daddy, I don't think it IS preposterous. That's really what 

I want to discuss. It comes to this--am I to be trusted to take care of 

myself, or am I not?" 

 

"To judge from this proposal of yours, I should say not." 

 

"I think I am." 

 

"As long as you remain under my roof--" he began, and paused. 

 

"You are going to treat me as though I wasn't. Well, I don't think 

that's fair." 

 

"Your ideas of fairness--" he remarked, and discontinued that sentence. 

"My dear girl," he said, in a tone of patient reasonableness, "you are a 

mere child. You know nothing of life, nothing of its dangers, nothing of 

its possibilities. You think everything is harmless and simple, and so 

forth. It isn't. It isn't. That's where you go wrong. In some things, 

in many things, you must trust to your elders, to those who know more of 

life than you do. Your aunt and I have discussed all this matter. There 

it is. You can't go." 

 

The conversation hung for a moment. Ann Veronica tried to keep hold of 

a complicated situation and not lose her head. She had turned round 

sideways, so as to look down into the fire. 

 

"You see, father," she said, "it isn't only this affair of the dance. 

I want to go to that because it's a new experience, because I think 

it will be interesting and give me a view of things. You say I know 

nothing. That's probably true. But how am I to know of things?" 

 

"Some things I hope you may never know," he said. 

 

"I'm not so sure. I want to know--just as much as I can." 

 

"Tut!" he said, fuming, and put out his hand to the papers in the pink 

tape. 

 

"Well, I do. It's just that I want to say. I want to be a human being; 

I want to learn about things and know about things, and not to be 

protected as something too precious for life, cooped up in one narrow 

little corner." 

 

"Cooped up!" he cried. "Did I stand in the way of your going to college? 

Have I ever prevented you going about at any reasonable hour? You've got 


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