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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

us--considering everything; but she tried to be practical and 

sympathetic and live down to our standards." 

 

Capes looked at his wife's unsmiling face. 

 

"Your father," he said, "remarked that all's well that ends well, and 

that he was disposed to let bygones be bygones. He then spoke with a 

certain fatherly kindliness of the past...." 

 

"And my heart has ached for him!" 

 

"Oh, no doubt it cut him at the time. It must have cut him." 

 

"We might even have--given it up for them!" 

 

"I wonder if we could." 

 

"I suppose all IS well that ends well. Somehow to-night--I don't know." 

 

"I suppose so. I'm glad the old sore is assuaged. Very glad. But if we 

had gone under--!" 

 

They regarded one another silently, and Ann Veronica had one of her 

penetrating flashes. 

 

"We are not the sort that goes under," said Ann Veronica, holding her 

hands so that the red reflections vanished from her eyes. "We settled 

long ago--we're hard stuff. We're hard stuff!" 

 

Then she went on: "To think that is my father! Oh, my dear! He stood 

over me like a cliff; the thought of him nearly turned me aside from 

everything we have done. He was the social order; he was law and wisdom. 

And they come here, and they look at our furniture to see if it is good; 

and they are not glad, it does not stir them, that at last, at last we 

can dare to have children." 

 

She dropped back into a crouching attitude and began to weep. "Oh, 

my dear!" she cried, and suddenly flung herself, kneeling, into her 

husband's arms. 

 

"Do you remember the mountains? Do you remember how we loved one 

another? How intensely we loved one another! Do you remember the light 

on things and the glory of things? I'm greedy, I'm greedy! I want 

children like the mountains and life like the sky. Oh! and love--love! 

We've had so splendid a time, and fought our fight and won. And it's 

like the petals falling from a flower. Oh, I've loved love, dear! I've 

loved love and you, and the glory of you; and the great time is over, 

and I have to go carefully and bear children, and--take care of my 

hair--and when I am done with that I shall be an old woman. The petals 

have fallen--the red petals we loved so. We're hedged about with 

discretions--and all this furniture--and successes! We are successful 

at last! Successful! But the mountains, dear! We won't forget the 

mountains, dear, ever. That shining slope of snow, and how we talked of 

death! We might have died! Even when we are old, when we are rich as we 


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