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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

to hesitate whether he had not gone too far. He looked at his port wine 

as though that tawny ruby contained the solution of the matter. "All's 

well that ends well," he said; "and the less one says about things the 

better." 

 

"Of course," said Capes, and threw a newly lit cigar into the fire 

through sheer nervousness. "Have some more port wine, sir?" 

 

"It's a very sound wine," said Mr. Stanley, consenting with dignity. 

 

"Ann Veronica has never looked quite so well, I think," said Capes, 

clinging, because of a preconceived plan, to the suppressed topic. 

 

 

 

Part 3 

 

 

At last the evening was over, and Capes and his wife had gone down to 

see Mr. Stanley and his sister into a taxicab, and had waved an amiable 

farewell from the pavement steps. 

 

"Great dears!" said Capes, as the vehicle passed out of sight. 

 

"Yes, aren't they?" said Ann Veronica, after a thoughtful pause. And 

then, "They seem changed." 

 

"Come in out of the cold," said Capes, and took her arm. 

 

"They seem smaller, you know, even physically smaller," she said. 

 

"You've grown out of them.... Your aunt liked the pheasant." 

 

"She liked everything. Did you hear us through the archway, talking 

cookery?" 

 

They went up by the lift in silence. 

 

"It's odd," said Ann Veronica, re-entering the flat. 

 

"What's odd?" 

 

"Oh, everything!" 

 

She shivered, and went to the fire and poked it. Capes sat down in the 

arm-chair beside her. 

 

"Life's so queer," she said, kneeling and looking into the flames. "I 

wonder--I wonder if we shall ever get like that." 

 

She turned a firelit face to her husband. "Did you tell him?" 

 

Capes smiled faintly. "Yes." 

 

"How?" 

 

"Well--a little clumsily." 

 

"But how?" 

 

"I poured him out some port wine, and I said--let me see--oh, 'You are 

going to be a grandfather!'" 

 

"Yes. Was he pleased?" 

 

"Calmly! He said--you won't mind my telling you?" 

 

"Not a bit." 

 

"He said, 'Poor Alice has got no end!'" 

 

"Alice's are different," said Ann Veronica, after an interval. "Quite 

different. She didn't choose her man.... Well, I told aunt.... 

Husband of mine, I think we have rather overrated the emotional capacity 

of those--those dears." 

 

"What did your aunt say?" 

 

"She didn't even kiss me. She said"--Ann Veronica shivered again--"'I 

hope it won't make you uncomfortable, my dear'--like that--'and 

whatever you do, do be careful of your hair!' I think--I judge from 

her manner--that she thought it was just a little indelicate of 


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