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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

little difficult to see in the archway. They ought to put a lamp." 

 

Her father declared there had been no difficulty. 

 

"Dinner is served, m'm," said the efficient parlor-maid in the archway, 

and the worst was over. 

 

"Come, daddy," said Ann Veronica, following her husband and Miss 

Stanley; and in the fulness of her heart she gave a friendly squeeze to 

the parental arm. 

 

"Excellent fellow!" he answered a little irrelevantly. "I didn't 

understand, Vee." 

 

"Quite charming apartments," Miss Stanley admired; "charming! Everything 

is so pretty and convenient." 

 

The dinner was admirable as a dinner; nothing went wrong, from the 

golden and excellent clear soup to the delightful iced marrons 

and cream; and Miss Stanley's praises died away to an appreciative 

acquiescence. A brisk talk sprang up between Capes and Mr. Stanley, to 

which the two ladies subordinated themselves intelligently. The 

burning topic of the Mendelian controversy was approached on one or two 

occasions, but avoided dexterously; and they talked chiefly of letters 

and art and the censorship of the English stage. Mr. Stanley was 

inclined to think the censorship should be extended to the supply of 

what he styled latter-day fiction; good wholesome stories were being 

ousted, he said, by "vicious, corrupting stuff" that "left a bad taste 

in the mouth." He declared that no book could be satisfactory that left 

a bad taste in the mouth, however much it seized and interested the 

reader at the time. He did not like it, he said, with a significant 

look, to be reminded of either his books or his dinners after he had 

done with them. Capes agreed with the utmost cordiality. 

 

"Life is upsetting enough, without the novels taking a share," said Mr. 

Stanley. 

 

For a time Ann Veronica's attention was diverted by her aunt's interest 

in the salted almonds. 

 

"Quite particularly nice," said her aunt. "Exceptionally so." 

 

When Ann Veronica could attend again she found the men were discussing 

the ethics of the depreciation of house property through the increasing 

tumult of traffic in the West End, and agreeing with each other to a 

devastating extent. It came into her head with real emotional force that 

this must be some particularly fantastic sort of dream. It seemed to her 

that her father was in some inexplicable way meaner-looking than she 

had supposed, and yet also, as unaccountably, appealing. His tie had 

demanded a struggle; he ought to have taken a clean one after his 


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