Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

CHAPTER THE SEVENTEENTH 

 

IN PERSPECTIVE 

 

 

Part 1 

 

 

About four years and a quarter later--to be exact, it was four years and 

four months--Mr. and Mrs. Capes stood side by side upon an old Persian 

carpet that did duty as a hearthrug in the dining-room of their flat 

and surveyed a shining dinner-table set for four people, lit by 

skilfully-shaded electric lights, brightened by frequent gleams of 

silver, and carefully and simply adorned with sweet-pea blossom. Capes 

had altered scarcely at all during the interval, except for a new 

quality of smartness in the cut of his clothes, but Ann Veronica was 

nearly half an inch taller; her face was at once stronger and softer, 

her neck firmer and rounder, and her carriage definitely more womanly 

than it had been in the days of her rebellion. She was a woman now to 

the tips of her fingers; she had said good-bye to her girlhood in the 

old garden four years and a quarter ago. She was dressed in a simple 

evening gown of soft creamy silk, with a yoke of dark old embroidery 

that enhanced the gentle gravity of her style, and her black hair flowed 

off her open forehead to pass under the control of a simple ribbon of 

silver. A silver necklace enhanced the dusky beauty of her neck. Both 

husband and wife affected an unnatural ease of manner for the benefit of 

the efficient parlor-maid, who was putting the finishing touches to the 

sideboard arrangements. 

 

"It looks all right," said Capes. 

 

"I think everything's right," said Ann Veronica, with the roaming eye of 

a capable but not devoted house-mistress. 

 

"I wonder if they will seem altered," she remarked for the third time. 

 

"There I can't help," said Capes. 

 

He walked through a wide open archway, curtained with deep-blue 

curtains, into the apartment that served as a reception-room. Ann 

Veronica, after a last survey of the dinner appointments, followed him, 

rustling, came to his side by the high brass fender, and touched two or 

three ornaments on the mantel above the cheerful fireplace. 

 

"It's still a marvel to me that we are to be forgiven," she said, 

turning. 

 

"My charm of manner, I suppose. But, indeed, he's very human." 

 

"Did you tell him of the registry office?" 

 

"No--o--certainly not so emphatically as I did about the play." 

 

"It was an inspiration--your speaking to him?" 

 

"I felt impudent. I believe I am getting impudent. I had not been near 

the Royal Society since--since you disgraced me. What's that?" 

 

They both stood listening. It was not the arrival of the guests, but 


Page 1 from 8: [1]  2   3   4   5   6   7   8   Forward