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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

muddled for a time. But it's as you say. I've had the rarest luck and 

fallen on my feet." 

 

"We've both fallen on our feet! We're the rarest of mortals! The real 

thing! There's not a compromise nor a sham nor a concession between 

us. We aren't afraid; we don't bother. We don't consider each other; 

we needn't. That wrappered life, as you call it--we've burned the 

confounded rags! Danced out of it! We're stark!" 

 

"Stark!" echoed Ann Veronica. 

 

Part 7 

 

 

As they came back from that day's climb--it was up the Mittaghorn--they 

had to cross a shining space of wet, steep rocks between two grass 

slopes that needed a little care. There were a few loose, broken 

fragments of rock to reckon with upon the ledges, and one place where 

hands did as much work as toes. They used the rope--not that a rope was 

at all necessary, but because Ann Veronica's exalted state of mind made 

the fact of the rope agreeably symbolical; and, anyhow, it did insure a 

joint death in the event of some remotely possibly mischance. Capes went 

first, finding footholds and, where the drops in the strata-edges came 

like long, awkward steps, placing Ann Veronica's feet. About half-way 

across this interval, when everything seemed going well, Capes had a 

shock. 

 

"Heavens!" exclaimed Ann Veronica, with extraordinary passion. "My God!" 

and ceased to move. 

 

Capes became rigid and adhesive. Nothing ensued. "All right?" he asked. 

 

"I'll have to pay it." 

 

"Eh?" 

 

"I've forgotten something. Oh, cuss it!" 

 

"Eh?" 

 

"He said I would." 

 

"What?" 

 

"That's the devil of it!" 

 

"Devil of what?... You DO use vile language!" 

 

"Forget about it like this." 

 

"Forget WHAT?" 

 

"And I said I wouldn't. I said I'd do anything. I said I'd make shirts." 

 

"Shirts?" 

 

"Shirts at one--and--something a dozen. Oh, goodness! Bilking! Ann 

Veronica, you're a bilker!" 

 

Pause. 

 

"Will you tell me what all this is about?" said Capes. 

 

"It's about forty pounds." 

 

Capes waited patiently. 

 

"G. I'm sorry.... But you've got to lend me forty pounds." 

 

"It's some sort of delirium," said Capes. "The rarefied air? I thought 

you had a better head." 

 

"No! I'll explain lower. It's all right. Let's go on climbing now. It's 

a thing I've unaccountably overlooked. All right really. It can wait 

a bit longer. I borrowed forty pounds from Mr. Ramage. Thank goodness 

you'll understand. That's why I chucked Manning.... All right, I'm 

coming. But all this business has driven it clean out of my head.... 


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