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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

steady-headed and plucky, rather daring, but quite willing to be 

cautious at his command. 

 

One of the things that most surprised him in her was her capacity for 

blind obedience. She loved to be told to do things. 

 

He knew the circle of mountains about Saas Fee fairly well: he had been 

there twice before, and it was fine to get away from the straggling 

pedestrians into the high, lonely places, and sit and munch sandwiches 

and talk together and do things together that were just a little 

difficult and dangerous. And they could talk, they found; and never 

once, it seemed, did their meaning and intention hitch. They were 

enormously pleased with one another; they found each other beyond 

measure better than they had expected, if only because of the want of 

substance in mere expectation. Their conversation degenerated again 

and again into a strain of self-congratulation that would have irked an 

eavesdropper. 

 

"You're--I don't know," said Ann Veronica. "You're splendid." 

 

"It isn't that you're splendid or I," said Capes. "But we satisfy one 

another. Heaven alone knows why. So completely! The oddest fitness! 

What is it made of? Texture of skin and texture of mind? Complexion and 

voice. I don't think I've got illusions, nor you.... If I had never 

met anything of you at all but a scrap of your skin binding a book, Ann 

Veronica, I know I would have kept that somewhere near to me.... All 

your faults are just jolly modelling to make you real and solid." 

 

"The faults are the best part of it," said Ann Veronica; "why, even our 

little vicious strains run the same way. Even our coarseness." 

 

"Coarse?" said Capes, "We're not coarse." 

 

"But if we were?" said Ann Veronica. 

 

"I can talk to you and you to me without a scrap of effort," said 

Capes; "that's the essence of it. It's made up of things as small as the 

diameter of hairs and big as life and death.... One always dreamed 

of this and never believed it. It's the rarest luck, the wildest, most 

impossible accident. Most people, every one I know else, seem to have 

mated with foreigners and to talk uneasily in unfamiliar tongues, to be 

afraid of the knowledge the other one has, of the other one's perpetual 

misjudgment and misunderstandings. 

 

"Why don't they wait?" he added. 

 

Ann Veronica had one of her flashes of insight. 

 

"One doesn't wait," said Ann Veronica. 

 

She expanded that. "_I_ shouldn't have waited," she said. "I might have 


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