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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

old. They'll face facts as facts, and understand. Oh, to face facts! 

Gods! what a world it might be if people faced facts! Understanding! 

Understanding! There is no other salvation. Some day older people, 

perhaps, will trouble to understand younger people, and there won't 

be these fierce disruptions; there won't be barriers one must defy or 

perish.... That's really our choice now, defy--or futility.... The 

world, perhaps, will be educated out of its idea of fixed standards.... 

I wonder, Ann Veronica, if, when our time comes, we shall be any 

wiser?" 

 

Ann Veronica watched a water-beetle fussing across the green depths. 

"One can't tell. I'm a female thing at bottom. I like high tone for a 

flourish and stars and ideas; but I want my things." 

 

 

 

Part 2 

 

 

Capes thought. 

 

"It's odd--I have no doubt in my mind that what we are doing is wrong," 

he said. "And yet I do it without compunction." 

 

"I never felt so absolutely right," said Ann Veronica. 

 

"You ARE a female thing at bottom," he admitted. "I'm not nearly so sure 

as you. As for me, I look twice at it.... Life is two things, 

that's how I see it; two things mixed and muddled up together. Life is 

morality--life is adventure. Squire and master. Adventure rules, and 

morality--looks up the trains in the Bradshaw. Morality tells you what 

is right, and adventure moves you. If morality means anything it means 

keeping bounds, respecting implications, respecting implicit bounds. If 

individuality means anything it means breaking bounds--adventure. 

 

"Will you be moral and your species, or immoral and yourself? We've 

decided to be immoral. We needn't try and give ourselves airs. We've 

deserted the posts in which we found ourselves, cut our duties, exposed 

ourselves to risks that may destroy any sort of social usefulness in 

us.... I don't know. One keeps rules in order to be one's self. One 

studies Nature in order not to be blindly ruled by her. There's no sense 

in morality, I suppose, unless you are fundamentally immoral." 

 

She watched his face as he traced his way through these speculative 

thickets. 

 

"Look at our affair," he went on, looking up at her. "No power on earth 

will persuade me we're not two rather disreputable persons. You desert 

your home; I throw up useful teaching, risk every hope in your career. 

Here we are absconding, pretending to be what we are not; shady, to say 

the least of it. It's not a bit of good pretending there's any Higher 

Truth or wonderful principle in this business. There isn't. We never 


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