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Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

CHAPTER THE SIXTEENTH 

 

IN THE MOUNTAINS 

 

 

Part 1 

 

 

Next day Ann Veronica and Capes felt like newborn things. It seemed 

to them they could never have been really alive before, but only 

dimly anticipating existence. They sat face to face beneath an 

experienced-looking rucksack and a brand new portmanteau and a leather 

handbag, in the afternoon-boat train that goes from Charing Cross to 

Folkestone for Boulogne. They tried to read illustrated papers in an 

unconcerned manner and with forced attention, lest they should catch 

the leaping exultation in each other's eyes. And they admired Kent 

sedulously from the windows. 

 

They crossed the Channel in sunshine and a breeze that just ruffled the 

sea to glittering scales of silver. Some of the people who watched them 

standing side by side thought they must be newly wedded because of their 

happy faces, and others that they were an old-established couple because 

of their easy confidence in each other. 

 

At Boulogne they took train to Basle; next morning they breakfasted 

together in the buffet of that station, and thence they caught the 

Interlaken express, and so went by way of Spies to Frutigen. There was 

no railway beyond Frutigen in those days; they sent their baggage by 

post to Kandersteg, and walked along the mule path to the left of the 

stream to that queer hollow among the precipices, Blau See, where the 

petrifying branches of trees lie in the blue deeps of an icy lake, and 

pine-trees clamber among gigantic boulders. A little inn flying a 

Swiss flag nestles under a great rock, and there they put aside their 

knapsacks and lunched and rested in the mid-day shadow of the gorge 

and the scent of resin. And later they paddled in a boat above the 

mysterious deeps of the See, and peered down into the green-blues and 

the blue-greens together. By that time it seemed to them they had lived 

together twenty years. 

 

Except for one memorable school excursion to Paris, Ann Veronica had 

never yet been outside England. So that it seemed to her the whole world 

had changed--the very light of it had changed. Instead of English villas 

and cottages there were chalets and Italian-built houses shining white; 

there were lakes of emerald and sapphire and clustering castles, and 

such sweeps of hill and mountain, such shining uplands of snow, as she 

had never seen before. Everything was fresh and bright, from the kindly 

manners of the Frutigen cobbler, who hammered mountain nails into her 

boots, to the unfamiliar wild flowers that spangled the wayside. And 


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