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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

pleased that Ann Veronica's heart smote her. 

 

"I am very glad to hear you say it," he repeated, and refrained from 

further inquiry. "I think we are growing sensible," he said. "I think 

you are getting to understand me better." 

 

He hesitated, and walked away from her toward the house. Her eyes 

followed him. The curve of his shoulders, the very angle of his feet, 

expressed relief at her apparent obedience. "Thank goodness!" said 

that retreating aspect, "that's said and over. Vee's all right. There's 

nothing happened at all!" She didn't mean, he concluded, to give him any 

more trouble ever, and he was free to begin a fresh chromatic novel--he 

had just finished the Blue Lagoon, which he thought very beautiful and 

tender and absolutely irrelevant to Morningside Park--or work in peace 

at his microtome without bothering about her in the least. 

 

The immense disillusionment that awaited him! The devastating 

disillusionment! She had a vague desire to run after him, to state her 

case to him, to wring some understanding from him of what life was to 

her. She felt a cheat and a sneak to his unsuspecting retreating back. 

 

"But what can one do?" asked Ann Veronica. 

 

 

 

 

Part 3 

 

 

She dressed carefully for dinner in a black dress that her father 

liked, and that made her look serious and responsible. Dinner was quite 

uneventful. Her father read a draft prospectus warily, and her aunt 

dropped fragments of her projects for managing while the cook had a 

holiday. After dinner Ann Veronica went into the drawing-room with Miss 

Stanley, and her father went up to his den for his pipe and pensive 

petrography. Later in the evening she heard him whistling, poor man! 

 

She felt very restless and excited. She refused coffee, though she knew 

that anyhow she was doomed to a sleepless night. She took up one of her 

father's novels and put it down again, fretted up to her own room for 

some work, sat on her bed and meditated upon the room that she was now 

really abandoning forever, and returned at length with a stocking to 

darn. Her aunt was making herself cuffs out of little slips of insertion 

under the newly lit lamp. 

 

Ann Veronica sat down in the other arm-chair and darned badly for a 

minute or so. Then she looked at her aunt, and traced with a curious eye 

the careful arrangement of her hair, her sharp nose, the little drooping 

lines of mouth and chin and cheek. 

 

Her thought spoke aloud. "Were you ever in love, aunt?" she asked. 


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