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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

unduly--But--They're artistic people, Vee. That's the fact about them. 

We're different." 

 

"I suppose we are," said Vee, rearranging the flowers in her hand. 

 

"Friendships that are all very well between school-girls don't always go 

on into later life. It's--it's a social difference." 

 

"I like Constance very much." 

 

"No doubt. Still, one has to be reasonable. As you admitted to me--one 

has to square one's self with the world. You don't know. With people 

of that sort all sorts of things may happen. We don't want things to 

happen." 

 

Ann Veronica made no answer. 

 

A vague desire to justify himself ruffled her father. "I may seem 

unduly--anxious. I can't forget about your sister. It's that has always 

made me--SHE, you know, was drawn into a set--didn't discriminate 

Private theatricals." 

 

Ann Veronica remained anxious to hear more of her sister's story from 

her father's point of view, but he did not go on. Even so much allusion 

as this to that family shadow, she felt, was an immense recognition of 

her ripening years. She glanced at him. He stood a little anxious and 

fussy, bothered by the responsibility of her, entirely careless of what 

her life was or was likely to be, ignoring her thoughts and feelings, 

ignorant of every fact of importance in her life, explaining everything 

he could not understand in her as nonsense and perversity, concerned 

only with a terror of bothers and undesirable situations. "We don't want 

things to happen!" Never had he shown his daughter so clearly that the 

womenkind he was persuaded he had to protect and control could please 

him in one way, and in one way only, and that was by doing nothing 

except the punctual domestic duties and being nothing except restful 

appearances. He had quite enough to see to and worry about in the City 

without their doing things. He had no use for Ann Veronica; he had 

never had a use for her since she had been too old to sit upon his knee. 

Nothing but the constraint of social usage now linked him to her. And 

the less "anything" happened the better. The less she lived, in fact, 

the better. These realizations rushed into Ann Veronica's mind and 

hardened her heart against him. She spoke slowly. "I may not see the 

Widgetts for some little time, father," she said. "I don't think I 

shall." 

 

"Some little tiff?" 

 

"No; but I don't think I shall see them." 

 

Suppose she were to add, "I am going away!" 

 

"I'm glad to hear you say it," said Mr. Stanley, and was so evidently 


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