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Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

CHAPTER THE FIFTEENTH 

 

THE LAST DAYS AT HOME 

 

 

Part 1 

 

 

They decided to go to Switzerland at the session's end. "We'll clean up 

everything tidy," said Capes.... 

 

For her pride's sake, and to save herself from long day-dreams and an 

unappeasable longing for her lover, Ann Veronica worked hard at her 

biology during those closing weeks. She was, as Capes had said, a 

hard young woman. She was keenly resolved to do well in the school 

examination, and not to be drowned in the seas of emotion that 

threatened to submerge her intellectual being. 

 

Nevertheless, she could not prevent a rising excitement as the dawn of 

the new life drew near to her--a thrilling of the nerves, a secret 

and delicious exaltation above the common circumstances of 

existence. Sometimes her straying mind would become astonishingly 

active--embroidering bright and decorative things that she could say to 

Capes; sometimes it passed into a state of passive acquiescence, into 

a radiant, formless, golden joy. She was aware of people--her aunt, 

her father, her fellow-students, friends, and neighbors--moving about 

outside this glowing secret, very much as an actor is aware of the dim 

audience beyond the barrier of the footlights. They might applaud, or 

object, or interfere, but the drama was her very own. She was going 

through with that, anyhow. 

 

The feeling of last days grew stronger with her as their number 

diminished. She went about the familiar home with a clearer and clearer 

sense of inevitable conclusions. She became exceptionally considerate 

and affectionate with her father and aunt, and more and more concerned 

about the coming catastrophe that she was about to precipitate upon 

them. Her aunt had a once exasperating habit of interrupting her work 

with demands for small household services, but now Ann Veronica rendered 

them with a queer readiness of anticipatory propitiation. She was 

greatly exercised by the problem of confiding in the Widgetts; they were 

dears, and she talked away two evenings with Constance without broaching 

the topic; she made some vague intimations in letters to Miss Miniver 

that Miss Miniver failed to mark. But she did not bother her head very 

much about her relations with these sympathizers. 

 

And at length her penultimate day in Morningside Park dawned for her. 

She got up early, and walked about the garden in the dewy June sunshine 

and revived her childhood. She was saying good-bye to childhood and 

home, and her making; she was going out into the great, multitudinous 


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