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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

"Perhaps you don't. But a human being who is young and clean, as you 

are, is apt to ennoble--or explain away." 

 

"I've had a biological training. I'm a hard young woman." 

 

"Nice clean hardness, anyhow. I think you are hard. There's 

something--something ADULT about you. I'm talking to you now as though 

you had all the wisdom and charity in the world. I'm going to tell you 

things plainly. Plainly. It's best. And then you can go home and think 

things over before we talk again. I want you to be clear what you're 

really and truly up to, anyhow." 

 

"I don't mind knowing," said Ann Veronica. 

 

"It's precious unromantic." 

 

"Well, tell me." 

 

"I married pretty young," said Capes. "I've got--I have to tell you this 

to make myself clear--a streak of ardent animal in my composition. I 

married--I married a woman whom I still think one of the most beautiful 

persons in the world. She is a year or so older than I am, and she is, 

well, of a very serene and proud and dignified temperament. If you met 

her you would, I am certain, think her as fine as I do. She has never 

done a really ignoble thing that I know of--never. I met her when we 

were both very young, as young as you are. I loved her and made love to 

her, and I don't think she quite loved me back in the same way." 

 

He paused for a time. Ann Veronica said nothing. 

 

"These are the sort of things that aren't supposed to happen. They leave 

them out of novels--these incompatibilities. Young people ignore them 

until they find themselves up against them. My wife doesn't understand, 

doesn't understand now. She despises me, I suppose.... We married, 

and for a time we were happy. She was fine and tender. I worshipped her 

and subdued myself." 

 

He left off abruptly. "Do you understand what I am talking about? It's 

no good if you don't." 

 

"I think so," said Ann Veronica, and colored. "In fact, yes, I do." 

 

"Do you think of these things--these matters--as belonging to our Higher 

Nature or our Lower?" 

 

"I don't deal in Higher Things, I tell you," said Ann Veronica, "or 

Lower, for the matter of that. I don't classify." She hesitated. "Flesh 

and flowers are all alike to me." 

 

"That's the comfort of you. Well, after a time there came a fever in 

my blood. Don't think it was anything better than fever--or a bit 

beautiful. It wasn't. Quite soon, after we were married--it was just 

within a year--I formed a friendship with the wife of a friend, a woman 


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