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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

as cold and indifferent. 

 

Her heart failed her and her resolution became water. She remained 

standing stiffly, unable even to move. She could not look at him through 

an interval that seemed to her a vast gulf of time. But she felt his lax 

figure become rigid. 

 

At last his voice came to release her tension. 

 

"I thought you weren't keeping up to the mark. You--It's jolly of you to 

confide in me. Still--" Then, with incredible and obviously deliberate 

stupidity, and a voice as flat as her own, he asked, "Who is the man?" 

 

Her spirit raged within her at the dumbness, the paralysis that had 

fallen upon her. Grace, confidence, the power of movement even, seemed 

gone from her. A fever of shame ran through her being. Horrible doubts 

assailed her. She sat down awkwardly and helplessly on one of the little 

stools by her table and covered her face with her hands. 

 

"Can't you SEE how things are?" she said. 

 

 

 

Part 2 

 

 

Before Capes could answer her in any way the door at the end of the 

laboratory opened noisily and Miss Klegg appeared. She went to her own 

table and sat down. At the sound of the door Ann Veronica uncovered 

a tearless face, and with one swift movement assumed a conversational 

attitude. Things hung for a moment in an awkward silence. 

 

"You see," said Ann Veronica, staring before her at the window-sash, 

"that's the form my question takes at the present time." 

 

Capes had not quite the same power of recovery. He stood with his 

hands in his pockets looking at Miss Klegg's back. His face was white. 

"It's--it's a difficult question." He appeared to be paralyzed by 

abstruse acoustic calculations. Then, very awkwardly, he took a stool 

and placed it at the end of Ann Veronica's table, and sat down. He 

glanced at Miss Klegg again, and spoke quickly and furtively, with eager 

eyes on Ann Veronica's face. 

 

"I had a faint idea once that things were as you say they are, but the 

affair of the ring--of the unexpected ring--puzzled me. Wish SHE"--he 

indicated Miss Klegg's back with a nod--"was at the bottom of the 

sea.... I would like to talk to you about this--soon. If you don't think 

it would be a social outrage, perhaps I might walk with you to your 

railway station." 

 

"I will wait," said Ann Veronica, still not looking at him, "and we will 

go into Regent's Park. No--you shall come with me to Waterloo." 

 

"Right!" he said, and hesitated, and then got up and went into the 

preparation-room. 


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