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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

fixed it." 

 

"But--" 

 

"He left her alone. Pure romantic nonsense on her part. Sheer 

calculation on his. Went up to Somerset House to examine the will before 

he did it. Yes. Nice position." 

 

"She doesn't care for him now?" 

 

"Not a bit. What a girl of sixteen cares for is hair and a high color 

and moonlight and a tenor voice. I suppose most of our daughters would 

marry organ-grinders if they had a chance--at that age. My son wanted 

to marry a woman of thirty in a tobacconist's shop. Only a son's another 

story. We fixed that. Well, that's the situation. My people don't know 

what to do. Can't face a scandal. Can't ask the gent to go abroad and 

condone a bigamy. He misstated her age and address; but you can't get 

home on him for a thing like that.... There you are! Girl spoilt for 

life. Makes one want to go back to the Oriental system!" 

 

Mr. Stanley poured wine. "Damned Rascal!" he said. "Isn't there a 

brother to kick him?" 

 

"Mere satisfaction," reflected Ogilvy. "Mere sensuality. I rather think 

they have kicked him, from the tone of some of the letters. Nice, of 

course. But it doesn't alter the situation." 

 

"It's these Rascals," said Mr. Stanley, and paused. 

 

"Always has been," said Ogilvy. "Our interest lies in heading them off." 

 

"There was a time when girls didn't get these extravagant ideas." 

 

"Lydia Languish, for example. Anyhow, they didn't run about so much." 

 

"Yes. That's about the beginning. It's these damned novels. All this 

torrent of misleading, spurious stuff that pours from the press. These 

sham ideals and advanced notions. Women who Dids, and all that kind of 

thing...." 

 

Ogilvy reflected. "This girl--she's really a very charming, frank 

person--had had her imagination fired, so she told me, by a school 

performance of Romeo and Juliet." 

 

Mr. Stanley decided to treat that as irrelevant. "There ought to be a 

Censorship of Books. We want it badly at the present time. Even WITH 

the Censorship of Plays there's hardly a decent thing to which a man can 

take his wife and daughters, a creeping taint of suggestion everywhere. 

What would it be without that safeguard?" 

 

Ogilvy pursued his own topic. "I'm inclined to think, Stanley, myself 

that as a matter of fact it was the expurgated Romeo and Juliet did the 

mischief. If our young person hadn't had the nurse part cut out, eh? She 

might have known more and done less. I was curious about that. All they 

left it was the moon and stars. And the balcony and 'My Romeo!'" 


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