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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

he remarked: "These young people shoot up, Stanley. It seems only 

yesterday that she was running down the Avenue, all hair and legs." 

 

Mr. Stanley regarded him through his glasses with something approaching 

animosity. 

 

"Now she's all hat and ideas," he said, with an air of humor. 

 

"She seems an unusually clever girl," said Ramage. 

 

Mr. Stanley regarded his neighbor's clean-shaven face almost warily. 

"I'm not sure whether we don't rather overdo all this higher education," 

he said, with an effect of conveying profound meanings. 

 

 

Part 6 

 

 

He became quite sure, by a sort of accumulation of reflection, as the 

day wore on. He found his youngest daughter intrusive in his thoughts 

all through the morning, and still more so in the afternoon. He saw her 

young and graceful back as she descended from the carriage, severely 

ignoring him, and recalled a glimpse he had of her face, bright and 

serene, as his train ran out of Wimbledon. He recalled with exasperating 

perplexity her clear, matter-of-fact tone as she talked about 

love-making being unconvincing. He was really very proud of her, and 

extraordinarily angry and resentful at the innocent and audacious 

self-reliance that seemed to intimate her sense of absolute independence 

of him, her absolute security without him. After all, she only LOOKED a 

woman. She was rash and ignorant, absolutely inexperienced. Absolutely. 

He began to think of speeches, very firm, explicit speeches, he would 

make. 

 

He lunched in the Legal Club in Chancery Lane, and met Ogilvy. Daughters 

were in the air that day. Ogilvy was full of a client's trouble in 

that matter, a grave and even tragic trouble. He told some of the 

particulars. 

 

"Curious case," said Ogilvy, buttering his bread and cutting it up in a 

way he had. "Curious case--and sets one thinking." 

 

He resumed, after a mouthful: "Here is a girl of sixteen or seventeen, 

seventeen and a half to be exact, running about, as one might say, in 

London. Schoolgirl. Her family are solid West End people, Kensington 

people. Father--dead. She goes out and comes home. Afterward goes on to 

Oxford. Twenty-one, twenty-two. Why doesn't she marry? Plenty of money 

under her father's will. Charming girl." 

 

He consumed Irish stew for some moments. 

 

"Married already," he said, with his mouth full. "Shopman." 

 

"Good God!" said Mr. Stanley. 

 

"Good-looking rascal she met at Worthing. Very romantic and all that. He 


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