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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

magazine reader who had to get what he could from the monthly reviews, 

and was glad to meet with any information from nearer the fountainhead. 

In a little while he and she were talking quite easily and agreeably. 

They went on talking in the train--it seemed to her father a slight want 

of deference to him--and he listened and pretended to read the Times. He 

was struck disagreeably by Ramage's air of gallant consideration and Ann 

Veronica's self-possessed answers. These things did not harmonize with 

his conception of the forthcoming (if unavoidable) interview. After 

all, it came to him suddenly as a harsh discovery that she might be in 

a sense regarded as grownup. He was a man who in all things classified 

without nuance, and for him there were in the matter of age just two 

feminine classes and no more--girls and women. The distinction lay 

chiefly in the right to pat their heads. But here was a girl--she must 

be a girl, since she was his daughter and pat-able--imitating the 

woman quite remarkably and cleverly. He resumed his listening. She was 

discussing one of those modern advanced plays with a remarkable, with an 

extraordinary, confidence. 

 

"His love-making," she remarked, "struck me as unconvincing. He seemed 

too noisy." 

 

The full significance of her words did not instantly appear to him. Then 

it dawned. Good heavens! She was discussing love-making. For a time he 

heard no more, and stared with stony eyes at a Book-War proclamation in 

leaded type that filled half a column of the Times that day. Could she 

understand what she was talking about? Luckily it was a second-class 

carriage and the ordinary fellow-travellers were not there. Everybody, 

he felt, must be listening behind their papers. 

 

Of course, girls repeat phrases and opinions of which they cannot 

possibly understand the meaning. But a middle-aged man like Ramage ought 

to know better than to draw out a girl, the daughter of a friend and 

neighbor.... 

 

Well, after all, he seemed to be turning the subject. "Broddick is a 

heavy man," he was saying, "and the main interest of the play was the 

embezzlement." Thank Heaven! Mr. Stanley allowed his paper to drop 

a little, and scrutinized the hats and brows of their three 

fellow-travellers. 

 

They reached Wimbledon, and Ramage whipped out to hand Miss Stanley 

to the platform as though she had been a duchess, and she descended as 

though such attentions from middle-aged, but still gallant, merchants 


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