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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

understanding." 

 

Ahead of them walked a gentleman whom it was evident they must at their 

present pace very speedily overtake. It was Ramage, the occupant of the 

big house at the end of the Avenue. He had recently made Mr. Stanley's 

acquaintance in the train and shown him one or two trifling civilities. 

He was an outside broker and the proprietor of a financial newspaper; he 

had come up very rapidly in the last few years, and Mr. Stanley admired 

and detested him in almost equal measure. It was intolerable to think 

that he might overhear words and phrases. Mr. Stanley's pace slackened. 

 

"You've no right to badger me like this, Veronica," he said. "I can't 

see what possible benefit can come of discussing things that are 

settled. If you want advice, your aunt is the person. However, if you 

must air your opinions--" 

 

"To-night, then, daddy!" 

 

He made an angry but conceivably an assenting noise, and then Ramage 

glanced back and stopped, saluted elaborately, and waited for them to 

come up. He was a square-faced man of nearly fifty, with iron-gray hair 

a mobile, clean-shaven mouth and rather protuberant black eyes that now 

scrutinized Ann Veronica. He dressed rather after the fashion of the 

West End than the City, and affected a cultured urbanity that somehow 

disconcerted and always annoyed Ann Veronica's father extremely. He 

did not play golf, but took his exercise on horseback, which was also 

unsympathetic. 

 

"Stuffy these trees make the Avenue," said Mr. Stanley as they drew 

alongside, to account for his own ruffled and heated expression. "They 

ought to have been lopped in the spring." 

 

"There's plenty of time," said Ramage. "Is Miss Stanley coming up with 

us?" 

 

"I go second," she said, "and change at Wimbledon." 

 

"We'll all go second," said Ramage, "if we may?" 

 

Mr. Stanley wanted to object strongly, but as he could not immediately 

think how to put it, he contented himself with a grunt, and the motion 

was carried. "How's Mrs. Ramage?" he asked. 

 

"Very much as usual," said Ramage. "She finds lying up so much very 

irksome. But, you see, she HAS to lie up." 

 

The topic of his invalid wife bored him, and he turned at once to Ann 

Veronica. "And where are YOU going?" he said. "Are you going on again 

this winter with that scientific work of yours? It's an instance of 

heredity, I suppose." For a moment Mr. Stanley almost liked Ramage. 

"You're a biologist, aren't you?" 

 

He began to talk of his own impressions of biology as a commonplace 


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