Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

Part 5 

 

 

Ann Veronica's resolve to have things out with her father was not 

accomplished without difficulty. 

 

He was not due from the City until about six, and so she went and played 

Badminton with the Widgett girls until dinner-time. The atmosphere at 

dinner was not propitious. Her aunt was blandly amiable above a certain 

tremulous undertow, and talked as if to a caller about the alarming 

spread of marigolds that summer at the end of the garden, a sort of 

Yellow Peril to all the smaller hardy annuals, while her father brought 

some papers to table and presented himself as preoccupied with them. "It 

really seems as if we shall have to put down marigolds altogether next 

year," Aunt Molly repeated three times, "and do away with marguerites. 

They seed beyond all reason." Elizabeth, the parlormaid, kept coming in 

to hand vegetables whenever there seemed a chance of Ann Veronica asking 

for an interview. Directly dinner was over Mr. Stanley, having pretended 

to linger to smoke, fled suddenly up-stairs to petrography, and when 

Veronica tapped he answered through the locked door, "Go away, Vee! I'm 

busy," and made a lapidary's wheel buzz loudly. 

 

Breakfast, too, was an impossible occasion. He read the Times with an 

unusually passionate intentness, and then declared suddenly for the 

earlier of the two trains he used. 

 

"I'll come to the station," said Ann Veronica. "I may as well come up by 

this train." 

 

"I may have to run," said her father, with an appeal to his watch. 

 

"I'll run, too," she volunteered. 

 

Instead of which they walked sharply.... 

 

"I say, daddy," she began, and was suddenly short of breath. 

 

"If it's about that dance project," he said, "it's no good, Veronica. 

I've made up my mind." 

 

"You'll make me look a fool before all my friends." 

 

"You shouldn't have made an engagement until you'd consulted your aunt." 

 

"I thought I was old enough," she gasped, between laughter and crying. 

 

Her father's step quickened to a trot. "I won't have you quarrelling and 

crying in the Avenue," he said. "Stop it!... If you've got anything 

to say, you must say it to your aunt--" 

 

"But look here, daddy!" 

 

He flapped the Times at her with an imperious gesture. 

 

"It's settled. You're not to go. You're NOT to go." 

 

"But it's about other things." 

 

"I don't care. This isn't the place." 

 

"Then may I come to the study to-night--after dinner?" 

 

"I'm--BUSY!" 

 

"It's important. If I can't talk anywhere else--I DO want an 


Page 1 from 6: [1]  2   3   4   5   6   Forward