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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

was wildly exultant at the resolution she had taken, the end she had 

made to her blunder. She had only to get through this, to solace Manning 

as much as she could, to put such clumsy plasterings on his wounds as 

were possible, and then, anyhow, she would be free--free to put her fate 

to the test. She made a few protests, a few excuses for her action in 

accepting him, a few lame explanations, but he did not heed them or care 

for them. Then she realized that it was her business to let Manning talk 

and impose his own interpretations upon the situation so far as he was 

concerned. She did her best to do this. But about his unknown rival he 

was acutely curious. 

 

He made her tell him the core of the difficulty. 

 

"I cannot say who he is," said Ann Veronica, "but he is a married 

man.... No! I do not even know that he cares for me. It is no good going 

into that. Only I just want him. I just want him, and no one else will 

do. It is no good arguing about a thing like that." 

 

"But you thought you could forget him." 

 

"I suppose I must have thought so. I didn't understand. Now I do." 

 

"By God!" said Manning, making the most of the word, "I suppose it's 

fate. Fate! You are so frank so splendid! 

 

"I'm taking this calmly now," he said, almost as if he apologized, 

"because I'm a little stunned." 

 

Then he asked, "Tell me! has this man, has he DARED to make love to 

you?" 

 

Ann Veronica had a vicious moment. "I wish he had," she said. 

 

"But--" 

 

The long inconsecutive conversation by that time was getting on her 

nerves. "When one wants a thing more than anything else in the world," 

she said with outrageous frankness, "one naturally wishes one had it." 

 

She shocked him by that. She shattered the edifice he was building up 

of himself as a devoted lover, waiting only his chance to win her from a 

hopeless and consuming passion. 

 

"Mr. Manning," she said, "I warned you not to idealize me. Men ought not 

to idealize any woman. We aren't worth it. We've done nothing to deserve 

it. And it hampers us. You don't know the thoughts we have; the things 

we can do and say. You are a sisterless man; you have never heard the 

ordinary talk that goes on at a girls' boarding-school." 

 

"Oh! but you ARE splendid and open and fearless! As if I couldn't allow! 

What are all these little things? Nothing! Nothing! You can't sully 

yourself. You can't! I tell you frankly you may break off your 

engagement to me--I shall hold myself still engaged to you, yours just 


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