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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

gesticulated in the twilight background of her mind. 

 

She leaped suddenly at a desperate resolution, and in one moment had 

made it into a new self. She flung aside every plan she had in life, 

every discretion. Of course, why not? She would be honest, anyhow! 

 

She turned her eyes to Manning. 

 

He was sitting back from the table now, with one arm over the back 

of his green chair and the other resting on the little table. He was 

smiling under his heavy mustache, and his head was a little on one side 

as he looked at her. 

 

"And what was that dreadful confession you had to make?" he was saying. 

His quiet, kindly smile implied his serene disbelief in any confessible 

thing. Ann Veronica pushed aside a tea-cup and the vestiges of her 

strawberries and cream, and put her elbows before her on the table. "Mr. 

Manning," she said, "I HAVE a confession to make." 

 

"I wish you would use my Christian name," he said. 

 

She attended to that, and then dismissed it as unimportant. 

 

Something in her voice and manner conveyed an effect of unwonted gravity 

to him. For the first time he seemed to wonder what it might be that she 

had to confess. His smile faded. 

 

"I don't think our engagement can go on," she plunged, and felt exactly 

that loss of breath that comes with a dive into icy water. 

 

"But, how," he said, sitting up astonished beyond measure, "not go on?" 

 

"I have been thinking while you have been talking. You see--I didn't 

understand." 

 

She stared hard at her finger-nails. "It is hard to express one's self, 

but I do want to be honest with you. When I promised to marry you I 

thought I could; I thought it was a possible arrangement. I did think it 

could be done. I admired your chivalry. I was grateful." 

 

She paused. 

 

"Go on," he said. 

 

She moved her elbow nearer to him and spoke in a still lower tone. "I 

told you I did not love you." 

 

"I know," said Manning, nodding gravely. "It was fine and brave of you." 

 

"But there is something more." 

 

She paused again. 

 

"I--I am sorry--I didn't explain. These things are difficult. It wasn't 

clear to me that I had to explain.... I love some one else." 

 

They remained looking at each other for three or four seconds. Then 

Manning flopped back in his chair and dropped his chin like a man shot. 

There was a long silence between them. 

 

"My God!" he said at last, with tremendous feeling, and then again, "My 

God!" 

 

Now that this thing was said her mind was clear and calm. She heard this 


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