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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

was that she had grabbed a bait. She had grabbed! She became less and 

less attentive to his meditative, self-complacent fragments of talk as 

she told herself this. Her secret thoughts made some hasty, half-hearted 

excursions into the possibility of telling the thing in romantic 

tones--Ramage was as a black villain, she as a white, fantastically 

white, maiden.... She doubted if Manning would even listen to that. 

He would refuse to listen and absolve her unshriven. 

 

Then it came to her with a shock, as an extraordinary oversight, that 

she could never tell Manning about Ramage--never. 

 

She dismissed the idea of doing so. But that still left the forty 

pounds!... 

 

Her mind went on generalizing. So it would always be between herself and 

Manning. She saw her life before her robbed of all generous illusions, 

the wrappered life unwrappered forever, vistas of dull responses, crises 

of make-believe, years of exacting mutual disregard in a misty garden of 

fine sentiments. 

 

But did any woman get anything better from a man? Perhaps every woman 

conceals herself from a man perforce!... 

 

She thought of Capes. She could not help thinking of Capes. Surely 

Capes was different. Capes looked at one and not over one, spoke to one, 

treated one as a visible concrete fact. Capes saw her, felt for her, 

cared for her greatly, even if he did not love her. Anyhow, he did not 

sentimentalize her. And she had been doubting since that walk in the 

Zoological Gardens whether, indeed, he did simply care for her. Little 

things, almost impalpable, had happened to justify that doubt; something 

in his manner had belied his words. Did he not look for her in the 

morning when she entered--come very quickly to her? She thought of him 

as she had last seen him looking down the length of the laboratory to 

see her go. Why had he glanced up--quite in that way?... 

 

The thought of Capes flooded her being like long-veiled sunlight 

breaking again through clouds. It came to her like a dear thing 

rediscovered, that she loved Capes. It came to her that to marry any 

one but Capes was impossible. If she could not marry him, she would not 

marry any one. She would end this sham with Manning. It ought never 

to have begun. It was cheating, pitiful cheating. And then if some day 

Capes wanted her--saw fit to alter his views upon friendship.... 

 

Dim possibilities that she would not seem to look at even to herself 


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