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Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

Part 5 

 

 

At first the quality of her relationship to Manning seemed moving and 

beautiful to Ann Veronica. She admired and rather pitied him, and she 

was unfeignedly grateful to him. She even thought that perhaps she might 

come to love him, in spite of that faint indefinable flavor of absurdity 

that pervaded his courtly bearing. She would never love him as she 

loved Capes, of course, but there are grades and qualities of love. 

For Manning it would be a more temperate love altogether. Much more 

temperate; the discreet and joyless love of a virtuous, reluctant, 

condescending wife. She had been quite convinced that an engagement with 

him and at last a marriage had exactly that quality of compromise which 

distinguishes the ways of the wise. It would be the wrappered world 

almost at its best. She saw herself building up a life upon that--a 

life restrained, kindly, beautiful, a little pathetic and altogether 

dignified; a life of great disciplines and suppressions and extensive 

reserves... 

 

But the Ramage affair needed clearing up, of course; it was a flaw upon 

that project. She had to explain about and pay off that forty pounds.... 

 

Then, quite insensibly, her queenliness had declined. She was never able 

to trace the changes her attitude had undergone, from the time when she 

believed herself to be the pampered Queen of Fortune, the crown of a 

good man's love (and secretly, but nobly, worshipping some one else), 

to the time when she realized she was in fact just a mannequin for her 

lover's imagination, and that he cared no more for the realities of her 

being, for the things she felt and desired, for the passions and dreams 

that might move her, than a child cares for the sawdust in its doll. She 

was the actress his whim had chosen to play a passive part.... 

 

It was one of the most educational disillusionments in Ann Veronica's 

career. 

 

But did many women get anything better? 

 

This afternoon, when she was urgent to explain her hampering and 

tainting complication with Ramage, the realization of this alien quality 

in her relationship with Manning became acute. Hitherto it had been 

qualified by her conception of all life as a compromise, by her new 

effort to be unexacting of life. But she perceived that to tell Manning 

of her Ramage adventures as they had happened would be like tarring 

figures upon a water-color. They were in different key, they had a 

different timbre. How could she tell him what indeed already began to 

puzzle herself, why she had borrowed that money at all? The plain fact 


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