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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

"That is my dream of you," said Manning, warming. "I want my life to be 

beaten gold just in order to make it a fitting setting for yours. There 

you will be, in an inner temple. I want to enrich it with hangings and 

gladden it with verses. I want to fill it with fine and precious things. 

And by degrees, perhaps, that maiden distrust of yours that makes you 

shrink from my kisses, will vanish.... Forgive me if a certain 

warmth creeps into my words! The Park is green and gray to-day, but I am 

glowing pink and gold.... It is difficult to express these things." 

 

 

 

 

 

Part 4 

 

 

They sat with tea and strawberries and cream before them at a little 

table in front of the pavilion in Regent's Park. Her confession was 

still unmade. Manning leaned forward on the table, talking discursively 

on the probable brilliance of their married life. Ann Veronica sat back 

in an attitude of inattention, her eyes on a distant game of cricket, 

her mind perplexed and busy. She was recalling the circumstances under 

which she had engaged herself to Manning, and trying to understand a 

curious development of the quality of this relationship. 

 

The particulars of her engagement were very clear in her memory. She had 

taken care he should have this momentous talk with her on a garden-seat 

commanded by the windows of the house. They had been playing tennis, 

with his manifest intention looming over her. 

 

"Let us sit down for a moment," he had said. He made his speech a little 

elaborately. She plucked at the knots of her racket and heard him to the 

end, then spoke in a restrained undertone. 

 

"You ask me to be engaged to you, Mr. Manning," she began. 

 

"I want to lay all my life at your feet." 

 

"Mr. Manning, I do not think I love you.... I want to be very plain 

with you. I have nothing, nothing that can possibly be passion for you. 

I am sure. Nothing at all." 

 

He was silent for some moments. 

 

"Perhaps that is only sleeping," he said. "How can you know?" 

 

"I think--perhaps I am rather a cold-blooded person." 

 

She stopped. He remained listening attentively. 

 

"You have been very kind to me," she said. 

 

"I would give my life for you." 

 

Her heart had warmed toward him. It had seemed to her that life might 

be very good indeed with his kindliness and sacrifice about her. She 

thought of him as always courteous and helpful, as realizing, indeed, 

his ideal of protection and service, as chivalrously leaving her free to 

live her own life, rejoicing with an infinite generosity in every detail 


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