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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

to be passionately in love with Capes; at moments she had a giddy 

intimation that he was beginning to feel keenly interested in her. 

She realized more and more the quality of the brink upon which she 

stood--the dreadful readiness with which in certain moods she 

might plunge, the unmitigated wrongness and recklessness of such a 

self-abandonment. "He must never know," she would whisper to herself, 

"he must never know. Or else--Else it will be impossible that I can be 

his friend." 

 

That simple statement of the case was by no means all that went on in 

Ann Veronica's mind. But it was the form of her ruling determination; it 

was the only form that she ever allowed to see daylight. What else was 

there lurked in shadows and deep places; if in some mood of reverie it 

came out into the light, it was presently overwhelmed and hustled back 

again into hiding. She would never look squarely at these dream forms 

that mocked the social order in which she lived, never admit she 

listened to the soft whisperings in her ear. But Manning seemed more and 

more clearly indicated as a refuge, as security. Certain simple purposes 

emerged from the disingenuous muddle of her feelings and desires. Seeing 

Capes from day to day made a bright eventfulness that hampered her in 

the course she had resolved to follow. She vanished from the laboratory 

for a week, a week of oddly interesting days.... 

 

When she renewed her attendance at the Imperial College the third finger 

of her left hand was adorned with a very fine old ring with dark blue 

sapphires that had once belonged to a great-aunt of Manning's. 

 

That ring manifestly occupied her thoughts a great deal. She kept 

pausing in her work and regarding it, and when Capes came round to her, 

she first put her hand in her lap and then rather awkwardly in front of 

him. But men are often blind to rings. He seemed to be. 

 

In the afternoon she had considered certain doubts very carefully, 

and decided on a more emphatic course of action. "Are these ordinary 

sapphires?" she said. He bent to her hand, and she slipped off the ring 

and gave it to him to examine. 

 

"Very good," he said. "Rather darker than most of them. But I'm 

generously ignorant of gems. Is it an old ring?" he asked, returning it. 

 

"I believe it is. It's an engagement ring...." She slipped it on her 

finger, and added, in a voice she tried to make matter-of-fact: "It was 

given to me last week." 

 

"Oh!" he said, in a colorless tone, and with his eyes on her face. 


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