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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

hopes of women evolving into something higher. 

 

He was unusually absurd and ready, and all the time it seemed to Ann 

Veronica as a delightful possibility, as a thing not indeed to be 

entertained seriously, but to be half furtively felt, that he was being 

so agreeable because she had come back again. She returned home through 

a world that was as roseate as it had been gray overnight. 

 

But as she got out of the train at Morningside Park Station she had a 

shock. She saw, twenty yards down the platform, the shiny hat and broad 

back and inimitable swagger of Ramage. She dived at once behind the 

cover of the lamp-room and affected serious trouble with her shoe-lace 

until he was out of the station, and then she followed slowly and with 

extreme discretion until the bifurcation of the Avenue from the field 

way insured her escape. Ramage went up the Avenue, and she hurried 

along the path with a beating heart and a disagreeable sense of unsolved 

problems in her mind. 

 

"That thing's going on," she told herself. "Everything goes on, confound 

it! One doesn't change anything one has set going by making good 

resolutions." 

 

And then ahead of her she saw the radiant and welcoming figure of 

Manning. He came as an agreeable diversion from an insoluble perplexity. 

She smiled at the sight of him, and thereat his radiation increased. 

 

"I missed the hour of your release," he said, "but I was at the 

Vindicator Restaurant. You did not see me, I know. I was among the 

common herd in the place below, but I took good care to see you." 

 

"Of course you're converted?" she said. 

 

"To the view that all those Splendid Women in the movement ought to have 

votes. Rather! Who could help it?" 

 

He towered up over her and smiled down at her in his fatherly way. 

 

"To the view that all women ought to have votes whether they like it or 

not." 

 

He shook his head, and his eyes and the mouth under the black mustache 

wrinkled with his smile. And as he walked by her side they began a 

wrangle that was none the less pleasant to Ann Veronica because it 

served to banish a disagreeable preoccupation. It seemed to her in her 

restored geniality that she liked Manning extremely. The brightness 

Capes had diffused over the world glorified even his rival. 

 

 

 

Part 7 

 

 

The steps by which Ann Veronica determined to engage herself to marry 

Manning were never very clear to her. A medley of motives warred in her, 

and it was certainly not one of the least of these that she knew herself 


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