Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

stool, and sat down. As she did so the preparation-room door opened 

behind her. She heard it open, but as she felt unable to look round in 

a careless manner she pretended not to hear it. Then Capes' footsteps 

approached. She turned with an effort. 

 

"I expected you this morning," he said. "I saw--they knocked off your 

fetters yesterday." 

 

"I think it is very good of me to come this afternoon." 

 

"I began to be afraid you might not come at all." 

 

"Afraid!" 

 

"Yes. I'm glad you're back for all sorts of reasons." He spoke a little 

nervously. "Among other things, you know, I didn't understand quite--I 

didn't understand that you were so keenly interested in this suffrage 

question. I have it on my conscience that I offended you--" 

 

"Offended me when?" 

 

"I've been haunted by the memory of you. I was rude and stupid. We were 

talking about the suffrage--and I rather scoffed." 

 

"You weren't rude," she said. 

 

"I didn't know you were so keen on this suffrage business." 

 

"Nor I. You haven't had it on your mind all this time?" 

 

"I have rather. I felt somehow I'd hurt you." 

 

"You didn't. I--I hurt myself." 

 

"I mean--" 

 

"I behaved like an idiot, that's all. My nerves were in rags. I was 

worried. We're the hysterical animal, Mr. Capes. I got myself locked up 

to cool off. By a sort of instinct. As a dog eats grass. I'm right again 

now." 

 

"Because your nerves were exposed, that was no excuse for my touching 

them. I ought to have seen--" 

 

"It doesn't matter a rap--if you're not disposed to resent the--the way 

I behaved." 

 

"_I_ resent!" 

 

"I was only sorry I'd been so stupid." 

 

"Well, I take it we're straight again," said Capes with a note of 

relief, and assumed an easier position on the edge of her table. "But 

if you weren't keen on the suffrage business, why on earth did you go to 

prison?" 

 

Ann Veronica reflected. "It was a phase," she said. 

 

He smiled. "It's a new phase in the life history," he remarked. 

"Everybody seems to have it now. Everybody who's going to develop into a 

woman." 

 

"There's Miss Garvice." 

 

"She's coming on," said Capes. "And, you know, you're altering us all. 

I'M shaken. The campaign's a success." He met her questioning eye, and 

repeated, "Oh! it IS a success. A man is so apt to--to take women a 

little too lightly. Unless they remind him now and then not to.... 

YOU did." 

 

"Then I didn't waste my time in prison altogether?" 

 

"It wasn't the prison impressed me. But I liked the things you said 


Page 6 from 10:  Back   1   2   3   4   5  [6]  7   8   9   10   Forward