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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

"The fees are paid to the end of the session." 

 

He nodded twice, with his eyes on the fire, as though that was a formal 

statement. 

 

"You may go on with that work," he said, "so long as you keep in harmony 

with things at home. I'm convinced that much of Russell's investigations 

are on wrong lines, unsound lines. Still--you must learn for yourself. 

You're of age--you're of age." 

 

"The work's almost essential for the B.Sc. exam." 

 

"It's scandalous, but I suppose it is." 

 

Their agreement so far seemed remarkable, and yet as a home-coming the 

thing was a little lacking in warmth. But Ann Veronica had still to get 

to her chief topic. They were silent for a time. "It's a period of crude 

views and crude work," said Mr. Stanley. "Still, these Mendelian fellows 

seem likely to give Mr. Russell trouble, a good lot of trouble. Some of 

their specimens--wonderfully selected, wonderfully got up." 

 

"Daddy," said Ann Veronica, "these affairs--being away from home 

has--cost money." 

 

"I thought you would find that out." 

 

"As a matter of fact, I happen to have got a little into debt." 

 

"NEVER!" 

 

Her heart sank at the change in his expression. 

 

"Well, lodgings and things! And I paid my fees at the College." 

 

"Yes. But how could you get--Who gave you credit? 

 

"You see," said Ann Veronica, "my landlady kept on my room while I 

was in Holloway, and the fees for the College mounted up pretty 

considerably." She spoke rather quickly, because she found her father's 

question the most awkward she had ever had to answer in her life. 

 

"Molly and you settled about the rooms. She said you HAD some money." 

 

"I borrowed it," said Ann Veronica in a casual tone, with white despair 

in her heart. 

 

"But who could have lent you money?" 

 

"I pawned my pearl necklace. I got three pounds, and there's three on my 

watch." 

 

"Six pounds. H'm. Got the tickets? Yes, but then--you said you 

borrowed?" 

 

"I did, too," said Ann Veronica. 

 

"Who from?" 

 

She met his eye for a second and her heart failed her. The truth 

was impossible, indecent. If she mentioned Ramage he might have a 

fit--anything might happen. She lied. "The Widgetts," she said. 

 

"Tut, tut!" he said. "Really, Vee, you seem to have advertised our 

relations pretty generally!" 

 

"They--they knew, of course. Because of the Dance." 

 

"How much do you owe them?" 

 

She knew forty pounds was a quite impossible sum for their neighbors. 


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