Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

ringing in their ears. 

 

"Dreadful women, my dear!" said Miss Stanley. "And some of them quite 

pretty and well dressed. No need to do such things. We must never 

let your father know we went. Why ever did you let me get into that 

wagonette?" 

 

"I thought we had to," said Ann Veronica, who had also been a little 

under the compulsion of the marshals of the occasion. "It was very 

tiring." 

 

"We will have some tea in the drawing-room as soon as ever we can--and I 

will take my things off. I don't think I shall ever care for this bonnet 

again. We'll have some buttered toast. Your poor cheeks are quite sunken 

and hollow...." 

 

 

 

Part 3 

 

 

When Ann Veronica found herself in her father's study that evening it 

seemed to her for a moment as though all the events of the past six 

months had been a dream. The big gray spaces of London, the shop-lit, 

greasy, shining streets, had become very remote; the biological 

laboratory with its work and emotions, the meetings and discussions, 

the rides in hansoms with Ramage, were like things in a book read and 

closed. The study seemed absolutely unaltered, there was still the same 

lamp with a little chip out of the shade, still the same gas fire, still 

the same bundle of blue and white papers, it seemed, with the same pink 

tape about them, at the elbow of the arm-chair, still the same father. 

He sat in much the same attitude, and she stood just as she had stood 

when he told her she could not go to the Fadden Dance. Both had dropped 

the rather elaborate politeness of the dining-room, and in their faces 

an impartial observer would have discovered little lines of obstinate 

wilfulness in common; a certain hardness--sharp, indeed, in the father 

and softly rounded in the daughter--but hardness nevertheless, that made 

every compromise a bargain and every charity a discount. 

 

"And so you have been thinking?" her father began, quoting her letter 

and looking over his slanting glasses at her. "Well, my girl, I wish you 

had thought about all these things before these bothers began." 

 

Ann Veronica perceived that she must not forget to remain eminently 

reasonable. 

 

"One has to live and learn," she remarked, with a passable imitation of 

her father's manner. 

 

"So long as you learn," said Mr. Stanley. 

 

Their conversation hung. 

 

"I suppose, daddy, you've no objection to my going on with my work at 

the Imperial College?" she asked. 

 

"If it will keep you busy," he said, with a faintly ironical smile. 


Page 2 from 10:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   Forward