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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

 

CHAPTER THE TWELFTH 

 

ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER 

 

 

Part 1 

 

 

Ann Veronica made a strenuous attempt to carry out her good resolutions. 

She meditated long and carefully upon her letter to her father before 

she wrote it, and gravely and deliberately again before she despatched 

it. 

 

 

"MY DEAR FATHER," she wrote,--"I have been thinking hard about 

everything since I was sent to this prison. All these experiences have 

taught me a great deal about life and realities. I see that compromise 

is more necessary to life than I ignorantly supposed it to be, and I 

have been trying to get Lord Morley's book on that subject, but it does 

not appear to be available in the prison library, and the chaplain seems 

to regard him as an undesirable writer." 

 

At this point she had perceived that she was drifting from her subject. 

 

"I must read him when I come out. But I see very clearly that as things 

are a daughter is necessarily dependent on her father and bound while 

she is in that position to live harmoniously with his ideals." 

 

"Bit starchy," said Ann Veronica, and altered the key abruptly. Her 

concluding paragraph was, on the whole, perhaps, hardly starchy enough. 

 

"Really, daddy, I am sorry for all I have done to put you out. May I 

come home and try to be a better daughter to you? 

 

"ANN VERONICA." 

 

 

 

Part 2 

 

 

Her aunt came to meet her outside Canongate, and, being a little 

confused between what was official and what was merely a rebellious 

slight upon our national justice, found herself involved in a triumphal 

procession to the Vindicator Vegetarian Restaurant, and was specifically 

and personally cheered by a small, shabby crowd outside that rendezvous. 

They decided quite audibly, "She's an Old Dear, anyhow. Voting wouldn't 

do no 'arm to 'er." She was on the very verge of a vegetarian meal 

before she recovered her head again. Obeying some fine instinct, she had 

come to the prison in a dark veil, but she had pushed this up to kiss 

Ann Veronica and never drawn it down again. Eggs were procured for her, 

and she sat out the subsequent emotions and eloquence with the dignity 

becoming an injured lady of good family. The quiet encounter and 

home-coming Ann Veronica and she had contemplated was entirely 

disorganized by this misadventure; there were no adequate explanations, 

and after they had settled things at Ann Veronica's lodgings, they 

reached home in the early afternoon estranged and depressed, with 

headaches and the trumpet voice of the indomitable Kitty Brett still 


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