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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

yourself to the people God has set about you. Every one else does." 

 

She thought more and more along that line. There was no reason why 

she shouldn't be Capes' friend. He did like her, anyhow; he was always 

pleased to be with her. There was no reason why she shouldn't be his 

restrained and dignified friend. After all, that was life. Nothing was 

given away, and no one came so rich to the stall as to command all that 

it had to offer. Every one has to make a deal with the world. 

 

It would be very good to be Capes' friend. 

 

She might be able to go on with biology, possibly even work upon the 

same questions that he dealt with.... 

 

Perhaps her granddaughter might marry his grandson.... 

 

It grew clear to her that throughout all her wild raid for independence 

she had done nothing for anybody, and many people had done things for 

her. She thought of her aunt and that purse that was dropped on the 

table, and of many troublesome and ill-requited kindnesses; she thought 

of the help of the Widgetts, of Teddy's admiration; she thought, with 

a new-born charity, of her father, of Manning's conscientious 

unselfishness, of Miss Miniver's devotion. 

 

"And for me it has been Pride and Pride and Pride! 

 

"I am the prodigal daughter. I will arise and go to my father, and will 

say unto him-- 

 

"I suppose pride and self-assertion are sin? Sinned against heaven--Yes, 

I have sinned against heaven and before thee.... 

 

"Poor old daddy! I wonder if he'll spend much on the fatted calf?... 

 

"The wrappered life-discipline! One comes to that at last. I begin to 

understand Jane Austen and chintz covers and decency and refinement and 

all the rest of it. One puts gloves on one's greedy fingers. One learns 

to sit up... 

 

"And somehow or other," she added, after a long interval, "I must pay 

Mr. Ramage back his forty pounds." 

 

 

 


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