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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

perceived that his countenance was only composed by a great effort, his 

features severely compressed. He was ruffled, and his ears were red, 

no doubt from some adjacent controversy. He classified her as he seated 

himself. 

 

"Another young woman, I suppose," he said, "who knows better than her 

Maker about her place in the world. Have you anything to ask me?" 

 

Ann Veronica readjusted her mind hastily. Her back stiffened. She 

produced from the depths of her pride the ugly investigatory note of 

the modern district visitor. "Are you a special sort of clergyman," she 

said, after a pause, and looking down her nose at him, "or do you go to 

the Universities?" 

 

"Oh!" he said, profoundly. 

 

He panted for a moment with unuttered replies, and then, with a scornful 

gesture, got up and left the cell. 

 

So that Ann Veronica was not able to get the expert advice she certainly 

needed upon her spiritual state. 

 

 

 

Part 4 

 

 

After a day or so she thought more steadily. She found herself in a 

phase of violent reaction against the suffrage movement, a phase 

greatly promoted by one of those unreasonable objections people of Ann 

Veronica's temperament take at times--to the girl in the next cell to 

her own. She was a large, resilient girl, with a foolish smile, a still 

more foolish expression of earnestness, and a throaty contralto voice. 

She was noisy and hilarious and enthusiastic, and her hair was always 

abominably done. In the chapel she sang with an open-lunged gusto that 

silenced Ann Veronica altogether, and in the exercising-yard slouched 

round with carelessly dispersed feet. Ann Veronica decided that 

"hoydenish ragger" was the only phrase to express her. She was always 

breaking rules, whispering asides, intimating signals. She became at 

times an embodiment for Ann Veronica of all that made the suffrage 

movement defective and unsatisfying. 

 

She was always initiating petty breaches of discipline. Her greatest 

exploit was the howling before the mid-day meal. This was an imitation 

of the noises made by the carnivora at the Zoological Gardens at 

feeding-time; the idea was taken up by prisoner after prisoner until 

the whole place was alive with barkings, yappings, roarings, pelican 

chatterings, and feline yowlings, interspersed with shrieks of 

hysterical laughter. To many in that crowded solitude it came as an 

extraordinary relief. It was better even than the hymn-singing. But it 

annoyed Ann Veronica. 


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